Arizona Has All Walks of Nature

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 8, 2009 | Go to article overview

Arizona Has All Walks of Nature


Byline: Gene Mueller, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

TUCSON, Ariz. -- On the way to the Sonoran Desert, I found a dead coyote lying crumpled alongside Interstate 10, the obvious victim of trucking and automobile traffic that zips along at 75 and 80 mph.

Tumbleweeds were, well, tumbling across the roadway whenever the wind picked up speed. Everywhere you looked, you could see giant saguaros dotting the landscape, their upward arms looking very much like a person being held up by unseen miscreants. Some of these famous members of the cactus family are dying inexplicably, which surely is a cause of concern for tourism officials. Who, after all, wants to see a huge dead cactus?

But none of the first impressions delivered by southern Arizona provide a fair picture. For starters, most of the state is ruggedly beautiful, with craggy, even snow-capped mountains, forests, a desert that is bigger than Maryland and Delaware combined, and orange and lemon trees that grow in the backyards of occasionally even the poorest people, whose roofs often are covered with red tiles, not run-of-the-mill asbestos shingles.

My destination west of Tucson was the impressive Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, which is an open-air zoo - yet it isn't a zoo. Unlike wildlife parks that mostly display caged animals, the Sonora layout looks like the adjacent desert that touches Mexico and California with its untold acres of ironwood trees and mesquite, creosote and hilltop palo verde bushes and shrubs wedged between rocks and 100 varieties of cactuses, including the huge saguaros.

Somewhere amid this desert flora a pair of dark eyes watches every move you make as you quietly walk along a maze of footpaths. It's a mountain lion; no, suddenly there are two of them, long-tailed and luxuriously furred, safe from human contact, separated by a barely noticeable moat tied into a natural depression in the landscape.

Close by, more than one pair of eyes follow you from between the trunks of old cottonwoods and thick palo verde shrubs. It's a trio of Mexican gray wolves. For all purposes they look like well-fed German shepherds - only more massive, with longer legs and far more aloof than any dog could ever be. The wolves appear to be regally bored despite the adulation of the visitors.

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