Logan Promotes U.S.-Jamaica Clash

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 8, 2009 | Go to article overview

Logan Promotes U.S.-Jamaica Clash


Byline: Steve Nearman, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

USA Track & Field proposed last week that the world's two dominant sprinting powers - the United States and Jamaica - meet for face-to-face matchups.

That's positive news for the sport's governing body, with chief executive Doug Logan working hard to clean up the sport's drug-tarnished image, make the organization more functional, and produce an exciting product for track enthusiasts.

Right out of the gate last year, Logan went on a verbal marathon about his dislike of performance-enhancing drugs and its users. He went on to tackle USATF's bloated and fractious board of directors, reducing the number from 31 to 15.

One of those new board members is former Olympian Steve Holman, who won two national championships in the 1,500 meters at Georgetown.

Logan forced USATF to consider its image. Calling it the Project 30 Task Force (the goal of 30 clean medals in the 2012 London Olympics), USATF last month issued a 69-page report after analyzing Team USA's performance in Beijing. It charted a course for programmatic change to maximize Team USA's performance in Olympic and world championship competition.

One of the key findings: Overall, there is a lack of accountability, professionalism and cohesion in the areas the task force studied. No surprise there.

In an effort to stimulate the sport, Logan on Saturday invited Jamaica to engage in a home-and-home series this year. The event will pit the two nations' sprinters and hurdlers against each other in head-to-head, team-scored competition.

His invitation came five days after the International Association of Athletic Federations announced that two of America's most prestigious meets - the Nike Prefontaine Classic in Eugene, Ore., and the Reebok Grand Prix in New York - will be part of a new circuit of elite track meets known as the IAAF Diamond League starting in 2010. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Logan Promotes U.S.-Jamaica Clash
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.