Social Justice

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 10, 2009 | Go to article overview

Social Justice


Byline: James Morrison, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

SOCIAL JUSTICE

When Iain Duncan Smith talks to a conservative audience about social justice, he says he can see their eyes roll.

What is this rubbish? he asked, posing the question that some conservatives at the Heritage Foundation were probably thinking Monday, as they listened to the former chairman of Britain's Conservative Party.

Social justice is an abomination to most conservatives, said Mr. Duncan Smith, now chairman of an independent think tank, the Center for Social Justice, in London.

Conservatives consider social justice as left-wing buzzwords for more spending on poverty programs that fail, for redistributing wealth for socialist goals or for excusing illegal conduct in pursuit of the root causes of crime.

However, for Mr. Duncan Smith, social justice is one of the keys for a conservative revival in Britain. He sees social justice as a way to encourage personal responsibility, mend broken families or battle drug addition and alcoholism.

We abandoned social justice to the left, and they've ripped the hell out of my country, Mr. Duncan Smith said.

Along with a conservative approach to social justice, he said conventional issues such as lower taxes and effective government spending have poised the Conservative Party to retake power at the next parliamentary election, due by June 2010.

The prospects of a Conservative government grows by the day, he said, citing public opinion polls that favor the party, nicknamed the Tories, by 12 percent to 20 percent.

We will take over the leadership of a country facing not only economic crisis but also a civic breakdown of fundamental British society.

The Labor Party, led by Prime Minister Gordon Brown, is facing its worst approval ratings since taking power under the charismatic Tony Blair in 1997. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Social Justice
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.