Passion and Dedication

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 10, 2009 | Go to article overview

Passion and Dedication


Byline: Sara Hooker shooker@dailyherald.com

After 30 years in education, Bertha Baillie still remembers the 3-year-old boy who could read anything.

Fascinated, she brought the tiny boy a medical journal and he spit out large, complicated medical terminology without hesitation. But he couldnAEt comprehend a word of it.

She spent a summer internship trying to help that boy learn and sheAEs spent a career living what he taught her.

Now those lessons and an energetic career teaching special education and kindergarten at Salt Creek Primary School in Elmhurst has led Baillie to become a Kohl McCormick finalist u one of the areaAEs most prestigious awards for early childhood education teachers.

Baillie, 54, of Aurora, says she accepts the recognition on behalf of all educators who have had that one student, or many students, who drive them.

"ItAEs a very challenging, very rewarding profession in that you get to learn from (students)," she said. "You canAEt do this job without knowing that youAEre learning a lot from your students, because theyAEre your teachers, too."

Baillie always knew she wanted to teach but never thought about teaching small children. Her experiences u growing up in Mexico, then Europe for a few years and finally in ChicagoAEs Hyde Park neighborhood u taught her to love diversity and learning. She imagined a career teaching archaeology and anthropology to high school or college students.

Baillie looks back to her summer interning at the University of Chicago Diagnostic Nursery while she was earning her bachelorAEs degree from Lawrence University in Appleton, Wis.

SheAEll always remember that little boy who could read but not understand.

"(I remember thinking) he obviously has broken the code of knowing how to read, but why doesnAEt he know what heAEs saying?" she said. "I remember being really struck and energized by the thought of maybe there is something I could do to help him understand what he was reading."

That experience led her to begin a career in 1979 at Salt Creek, teaching one of the areaAEs first courses geared toward children with autism. Her teaching position has evolved several times throughout the course of her career, from early childhood special needs to a full-day kindergarten teacher. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Passion and Dedication
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.