Not by Philosophy, Science and Theology Alone

Daily Examiner (Grafton, Australia), March 14, 2009 | Go to article overview
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Not by Philosophy, Science and Theology Alone


Jan Visser contends that more is needed than theology, science and philosophy if indeed humanity is to survive and take the next step in its evolution. This will be the subject of his talk when he comes to be a keynote speaker at the 6th Philosophy, Science and Theology Festival on Saturday, June 27 at 11am.

Jan is the President and Senior Researcher at the Learning Development Institute based in Marseilles, France. He is a theoretical physicist who has combined that with the study of philosophy. He has a deep interest in and passion for the visual and plastic arts; literary expression, particularly poetry; theatrical performance; and music.

From 1994 to 2000, Jan Visser was responsible for creating, developing and administering UNESCO's Learning Without Frontiers (LWF) initiative ( http://www.unesco.org/education/lwf (http://www.unesco.org/education/lwf) /), a global transdisciplinary program inspired by the recognition that the world of learning is one, that learning needs are lifelong and life-wide, that many learning needs remain unmet and many learners unreached, thus calling for a fundamental change of perceptions about learning and equally fundamental changes in the ways learning needs are being met. He moved into the position of Director for Learning Without Frontiers from the previous position at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris, France, as Senior Program Specialist in Learning Technologies and Educational Communication. Prior to that, he headed for four years (1990-1993) UNESCO's subregional office in Harare, Zimbabwe, with overall responsibility for the development and implementation of UNESCO's program in Southern Africa.

He has been a documentary filmmaker, prolific writer in a variety of fields; a frequent keynote speaker at international conferences and architect of various significant international development projects and programs, with broad managerial experience, including in the area of organisational change and organisational learning.

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