2009 Leaders to Watch

The Technology Teacher, March 2009 | Go to article overview

2009 Leaders to Watch


Those who have contributed to the technology education field for many years are known for their teaching, written work, presentations, research, and recognition received from professional groups. The selected individuals who are highlighted here have s wn outstanding leadership ability as educators early in their careers.

This list is by no means inclusive. There are many other professionals in the field with similarly impressive qualifications.

Individuals who want to recognize other technology educators with outstanding qualifications should forward their vitae and a sponsoring letter to ITEA for consideration.

The leaders of our field are our future; we should promote and encourage them to realize their potential.

Mauricio Castillo

Assistant Professor

Credential Advisor Technology Education

California State University, Los Angeles

Los Angeles, CA

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Mauricio Castillo is Assistant Professor and Director of the Center for Technology Education at California State University, Los Angeles. He received his bachelor's and master's degrees from California State University, Los Angeles. He earned his Ph.D. in Education and Human Resources Studies from Colorado State University.

Mauricio is originally from Mexico City where industrial arts is implemented starting at the junior high school level. In college, Mauricio started as a civil engineering major but later realized that this was not the major he wanted to pursue. While walking on campus, he saw a laboratory door open and noticed that it was a machine shop lab. The professor welcomed him in and suggested that he take a class. This led to Mauricio changing his major and pursuing a degree in Industrial Technology.

Mauricio has been actively involved in technology education since his undergraduate studies at California State University, Los Angeles. During his doctoral studies, Mauricio worked with the NSF NCETE grant as a graduate student and recently, as a project Co-PI. He has also collaborated in article reviews and curriculum review. Since joining the faculty at CSULA he became the coordinator of the technology education program and teaches all the courses for future teachers in the field of technology education. In 2007, he established the first TECA chapter at CSULA. He recently became a Co-PI for CSULA Partnership to Enhance G6-12 STEM in LAUSD District Five through Graduate Teaching Fellows. In 2008, he became the Director of the Center for Technology Education.

Mauricio worked as a high school teacher for seven years where he was very active during and after school. On a daily basis, he taught the students the importance of technology in their lives. He is still very active at the secondary level; he wants to make sure that all the students are aware of the different opportunities and careers a student can obtain with a technology degree.

Mauricio's research includes topics related to career preparation, technology education, and 2+2 programs, and in particular, the development of assessment tools for evaluating the effectiveness of technology education programs. In addition, he is currently conducting research in game design approach and its benefits to technology education.

The Council on Technology Teacher Education recognized Mauricio in 2006 as a Twenty-First Century Leader Associate. Mauricio is an active member of CTTE, ITEA, NCETE, and CITEA.

Vincent Childress

Professor and Graduate Coordinator Technology Education

Department of Graphic Communication Systems and Technological Studies

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

Greensboro, NC

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Vincent Childress is a professor of technology education at North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro, North Carolina. Vincent made the decision to become a technology educator while studying industrial arts in high school. …

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