At Last, a New Horror Tale; the Unborn's Premise in Obscure Jewish Folklore Makes for an Interesting Storyline

The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia), March 3, 2009 | Go to article overview

At Last, a New Horror Tale; the Unborn's Premise in Obscure Jewish Folklore Makes for an Interesting Storyline


FINALLY, a horror movie that's not a sequel or a remake has arrived.

And this one has a pretty interesting storyline, too.

Drawing on Jewish folklore, The Unborn stars Odette Yustman ( Cloverfield) as Casey Beldon, a college student tormented by dreams and visions involving a blue-eyed child, strange dogs, and a preserved human foetus.

After a bizarre experience with a boy she's babysitting (who tells her that "Jumby wants to be born now"), Casey discovers a family secret that links her to experiments performed by the Nazis in World War II and a Jewish spirit called a "dybbuk" that'll do anything to be "born" in a new body.

Sort of like a teenage, Hebrew, version of The Exorcist, The Unborn isn't the world's scariest horror film, but it does get credit for using real, and pretty obscure, mythology as its basis.

After all, there can't be many other horror movies out there that reference Jewish folklore and the mystic teachings of the Kabbalah!

The film also features a pretty good supporting cast, including Meegan Gold as Casey's superstitious best friend, and Gary Oldman as the disbelieving rabbi roped in to "exorcise" the evil spirit. …

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