The Wisdom of Our Elders: Continuing the Legacy

By Fields, Cheryl D. | Black Issues in Higher Education, February 20, 1997 | Go to article overview

The Wisdom of Our Elders: Continuing the Legacy


Fields, Cheryl D., Black Issues in Higher Education


WASHINGTON--Caring for the young;

breaking the barriers that divide African

Americans along class, age and gender

lines; and taking responsibility for the future

were the themes of February's Black Issues in

Higher Education videoconference, which was:

designed as a celebration of African American

history.

The tone of The Wisdom of the Elders

was set by twenty-five-year-old Rev. Jamal

Bryant, national youth and college director

for the National

Association for the

Advancement of Colored

People (NAACP). Bryant

opened the program with an

anecdote about a young

man at a highway toll

booth. When the young

man reached into his

empty pockets searching in

vain for away to pay, the

booth operator told him to go

ahead through, for the toll had already been

paid by those who had passed ahead of him.

"The only way we're able to sing `We

Shall Overcome' is because somebody else

helped us come over," Bryant said. "We must

always remember that, as we are going on to

this next millennium, we didn't get here on our

own. Somebody prayed for us, somebody

sacrificed for us.... We must always remember

to say thanks."

Panelist John W. Franklin, son of

renowned historian John Hope Franklin,

reminded the audience that in order for young

African Americans to feel gratitude toward

previous generations, they must first know

their history. He suggested that children

should begin by listening to the personal

histories of their adult relatives, neighbors and

friends. That is the way he first developed an

appreciation for African American history.

Jonah Edelman, son of Marian Wright

Edelman and executive director of National

Stand for Children, recalled how a road trip he

once took with his mother through the South

heightened his appreciation for the legacy he

has inherited and helped fortify his own sense

of purpose.

Edelman and Bryant agreed that one of

the biggest challenges for their generation is

building community. In response to a

question about whether the panelists were

part of the Black bourgeoisie, Bryant said

such labels only serve to pit African

Americans against one another.

Panelists Dr. Patricia Reid-Merritt, author

of "SisterPower" and professor of social work

and African American studies at New Jersey's

Richard Stockton State College, and Dr.

Dorothy Height, president of the National

Council of Negro Women, shared

their thoughts on the role women have

played--and must continue to play--in the

ongoing advancement of African American

people. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Wisdom of Our Elders: Continuing the Legacy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.