New Orleans Loses Blues Icon

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 22, 2009 | Go to article overview
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New Orleans Loses Blues Icon


Byline: Associated Press

New Orleans blues singer-pianist Eddie Bo, who worked with such musicians as Irma Thomas and Art Neville, has died. He was 79.

Bo, whose real name was Edwin Joseph Bocage, had a heart attack.

Bocage was an accomplished keyboardist-pianist with a career spanning more than five decades. An accomplished songwriter, Bocage penned the 1960 Etta James hit "My Dearest Darling" and "Im Wise," which was made famous by Little Richard when renamed and released in 1956 as "Slippin and Slidin."

Actor Ron Silver, who won a Tony Award as a take-no-prisoners Hollywood producer in David Mamets "Speed-the-Plow" and did a political about-face from loyal Democrat to Republican activist after the Sept. 11 attacks, has died. He was 62.

Silver, an Emmy nominee for a recurring role as a slick political strategist on "The West Wing," had a long history of balancing acting with left-leaning social and political causes.

But after the 2001 terrorist attacks, longtime Democrat Silver turned heads in Hollywood with outspoken support of President George W. Bush over the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

His big-screen credits included "Ali," "Reversal of Fortune," "Enemies: A Love Story," "Silkwood" and "Semi-Tough."

Natasha Richardson, a gifted and precocious heiress to acting royalty whose career highlights included the film "Patty Hearst" and a Tony-winning performance in a stage revival of "Cabaret," has died. She was 45.

Richardson divided her time between stage and screen. On Broadway, she won a Tony for her performance as Sally Bowles in a 1998 revival of "Cabaret." She also appeared in New York in a production of Patrick Marbers "Closer" (1999) as well as 2005 revival of Tennessee Williams "A Streetcar Named Desire," in which she played Blanche opposite John C. Reillys Stanley Kowalski.

Appalachian author Billy C. Clark, who wrote about Kentuckys Big Sandy River region, has died. He was 80.

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