The Plus One Policy: Japan Has a Rapidly Falling Population and an Anguished Debate Is Taking Place among the Elite: Should the Country Open Itself Up to an Influx of Immigrant Labour or Seal Its Borders and Adapt to a New Model of Economic Growth?

By Bonnett, Alastair | New Statesman (1996), March 9, 2009 | Go to article overview

The Plus One Policy: Japan Has a Rapidly Falling Population and an Anguished Debate Is Taking Place among the Elite: Should the Country Open Itself Up to an Influx of Immigrant Labour or Seal Its Borders and Adapt to a New Model of Economic Growth?


Bonnett, Alastair, New Statesman (1996)


By mid-century, the UN predicts, the population of Japan will have dropped from nearly 130 million to 100 million. This is the largest decline for any developed nation. Japan is not an aberration, but a trailblazer. How it is coping with a shrinking population is being scrutinised by other countries across Asia and Europe that have embarked on the same journey.

In Japan, depopulation has triggered a debate about national priorities. If the country is to continue with business as usual and pursue industrial growth, then the trend needs to be reversed. Yet many have grown weary of the treadmill of economic competitiveness and are using this new demographic shift as an opportunity to discuss a different vision of Japan's future.

Most politicians are of the opinion that population decline is economically dysfunctional and needs to be corrected, even if they are not sure how. The deputy chief cabinet secretary, Hakubun Shimomura, has pointed an accusing finger at Japanese women: if only they would "stay at home and raise their children".

What alarms Shimomura is that Japanese women have, on average, only 1.3 children each. Today Japan's fertility average is lower than China's (with an average of 1.6 children), although not quite as low as Taiwan's (1.1 children). The corresponding figure for the UK is 1.9; while at the other end of the spectrum, women in Afghanistan, Angola and Liberia have an average of 6.8 children. Since the Japanese have one of the highest life expectancies in the world, the country is facing a withering at one end of the life cycle, but a boom at the other. By 2050, there will be more than three times as many people aged 65 or over as there will be those under 14. It is also predicted that there will be 500,000 people aged 100 or over.

The obvious solution is immigration. One can read in the Japan Times of the need to "throw the country open to the millions of poor Asians, Africans and Latin Americans who would certainly come if invited". However, Japan has no history of being a country of immigration; only about 1.5 per cent of workers are foreign. Even in Tokyo, the figure rises to just 3 per cent. The Japanese myth of racial homogeneity is deep-rooted, insular and very protective. The Japanese look at societies, such as the United States and Britain, where immigrants have settled in large numbers, and see fractured societies in which an ill-treated caste of foreign labour fill low-paid jobs. For many, it is not an appealing vision of their own future.

According to the UN, if Japan wants to prevent a fall in its working-age population, it will need to take in as many as 650,000 immigrants every year until 2050. This would mean that by mid-century about a third of the population would be of non-Japanese heritage. Is Japan ready for this? …

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The Plus One Policy: Japan Has a Rapidly Falling Population and an Anguished Debate Is Taking Place among the Elite: Should the Country Open Itself Up to an Influx of Immigrant Labour or Seal Its Borders and Adapt to a New Model of Economic Growth?
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