How Should the Federal Government Effect Education Reform?

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 29, 2009 | Go to article overview
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How Should the Federal Government Effect Education Reform?


Byline: Dennis Van Roekel, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The National Education Association (NEA) generally supports local control of public schools. Education in the United States has always been a state responsibility that is implemented at the local level. That isn't going to change.

Yet our nation has also had a long-standing commitment to public education as the key that unlocks the door of opportunity. It was in the U.S. that the movement for universal high school first took hold. It was here that the G.I. Bill sent millions of veterans to college, and the National Defense Education Act helped to lay the groundwork for the technology explosion of the past few decades.

That national commitment to public education has served us well. In the 20th century, the American people attained the highest level of education of any citizens in the world. Today we are losing our edge in education, but we have the ability to regain the lead - if we renew our national commitment.

More than 50 million children attend our public schools. Many of them are receiving a first-rate education - as fine as any in the world. Too many others, however, attend schools where the classrooms are crowded, the teachers are the least experienced and there aren't enough textbooks, much less computers.

In a nation dedicated to the premise that all men are created equal, this disparity in education is fundamentally unfair. The NEA believes that every student in our country has a right to a great public school. This right should not be subject to a game of geographic roulette, where some children win and others lose just because of where they happen to live. Children in inner cities or small rural towns deserve the same opportunity to succeed as their counterparts in affluent suburbs.

Our nation has recognized the inequity of this situation. That is why Title I programs to help disadvantaged students were created more than 40 years ago. Title I and programs such as Head Start are intended to level the playing field, so poor children have a better chance to succeed in school.

The No Child Left Behind law (NCLB), which was enacted seven years ago, was also supposed to address inequities in education. Unfortunately, its main effect has been to distort and imbalance the federal role in education.

NCLB has distorted what goes on in our classrooms today. With high-stakes tests focused on math and reading, those subjects are emphasized at the expense of everything else - science, social studies, art, music, even physical education. Instead of trying to engage each child as an individual, teachers have been forced to adopt a drill and kill approach that takes the fun out of learning.

At this critical time in our nation's history, we must restore balance to the federal role in education.

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