Animal Psychology Naperville's Own Dr. Doolittle Says She Can Communicate with Pets

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 2, 2008 | Go to article overview

Animal Psychology Naperville's Own Dr. Doolittle Says She Can Communicate with Pets


Byline: Susan Dibble

sdibble@@dailyherald.com

When Barb Taylor adopted a new cat into her two-feline Naperville household last fall, the get-acquainted period didn't go as smoothly as she had hoped.

Her cats refused to lay out the welcome mat and the ensuing problems convinced her husband they should send the newcomer packing.

Instead, Taylor sought out Naperville animal communicator Rachael Resk to help resolve the impasse. Resk came to her home and asked to speak to each cat separately.

Buttons, the household's 24-year-old frail feline matriarch, was "daddy's girl."

But in her cat-human conversation with Resk, Buttons told the communicator she knew her owners' feelings for her and understood why they brought in another cat.

Topflight was another story. Sad and angry that his owners had adopted another male cat, he wanted to know if he had done something wrong.

The new cat, Treasure, later renamed Bogey, told Resk he had lost his last home and didn't want to lose this one. He wanted to know whether Taylor or her husband would make the decision whether to keep him.

Three or four sessions later, the tension faded away, Taylor said.

Her husband, who stayed away from the early sessions and even joked about them at first, became a believer in Resk after the cats revealed information about the household no one else could have known.

Topflight and Bogey never became friends, but with Resk's help and insight the hostility stopped.

Buttons has since passed on and Bogey has a new feline friend named Mulligan.

And Resk made a believer out of Taylor and her spouse.

"They all understand who they are and why they are," Taylor said. "It was really very accurate what she said."

Talking with animals

Resk says she's always been able to talk with animals, but didn't recognize it was a special gift until about eight years ago when she was at a pet show. She saw a sign for someone who called herself an animal communicator and asked what it was.

"I actually had this skill," she said, "but I never really knew it was something until that day."

Resk - who now works full-time as a cat and dog behaviorist and animal communicator - says she uses mental telepathy to communicate with pets. She sends and receives thoughts based on intuitive hearing, seeing, feeling and knowing.

"I don't actually have to see the animal," she said.

She's responded to pet owners' phone calls from New York and California, and e-mails from Japan. As long as she has a name, photo, description or some other link, she says she can form a mental picture.

The owner of several cats, Resk said she feels a special affinity for felines and founded a new cat adoption organization called PURRS, People United for Rescue and Rehabilitation. But she has talked with animals as diverse as hedgehogs, horses and hamsters.

"I can talk really to all living things; the birds outside, too. It's not limited," she said.

Resk, who also calls herself a spiritual teacher, offers private consultations, classes on animal communication and workshops. She formerly had an Internet-based radio show called "Paws and Effect," and lectures at pet expos and events.

She said pet owners come to her for five reasons: to build a bond with their pet; address behavioral issues; find a lost animal; identify a medical problem when they're unsure what's wrong; and confront the prospect of death and find out the sick animal's wishes.

Success stories

When Candace Dornquast of Streamwood gathered her fellow horse owners for a session with Resk a year ago, some of them did it simply as a lark. All of them ended up impressed, Dornquast said.

"Everyone at the stable felt she had a gift, even those doing it for fun," she said. "It was flabbergasting what she came up with.

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