Andrew J. Majeske. Equity in English Renaissance Literature: Thomas More and Edmund Spenser

By Schaeffer, John D. | Style, Winter 2008 | Go to article overview

Andrew J. Majeske. Equity in English Renaissance Literature: Thomas More and Edmund Spenser


Schaeffer, John D., Style


Andrew J. Majeske. Equity in English Renaissance Literature: Thomas More and Edmund Spenser. New York: Rontledge, 2006. ix + 217 pp.

The author states the purpose of this revised dissertation early in his introduction:

 
   This book will establish a broad historical context for the English 
   Renaissance understanding of the concept of equity, particularly 
   the idea's derivation from the classical Greek concept of [TEXT NOT 
   REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], in order to explain equity's various 
   significations in More's Utopia and Spenser's The Faerie Queene. 
   (1) 

This deceptively simple thesis addresses a tangle of legal and philosophical concepts that were drawn together, intertwined, and twisted over time into a Gordian knot of immense complexity. It takes over half the book just to trace the various concepts of equity before the literary texts are even introduced. More then gets the majority of what's left, while Spenser receives the last twenty-one pages. Then there are forty-eight pages of appendices which include excerpts on equity from the writings of Hobbes and Grotius, and a commentary by the author on Cicero's Verrine orations.

Majeske begins by outlining the meanings of Greek [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and Roman aequitas. The latter, he says, aimed at consistent application of the laws, that is, that a law would be applied the same way in several different cases. The goal was equality before the law. The Greek [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], on the other hand, aimed to adapt the law to "distinguishing characteristics of specific cases in order to achieve a result fitting to the circumstances particular to each case" (3). Aequitas aimed to eliminate difference; [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] celebrated difference. The author claims that these "two contrasting visions of fairness" were both contained within the concept of equity (3). The author, however, claims that there is another, esoteric, meaning of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] that signifies the "relation of the theoretically best possible commonwealth (utopia) to the best possible commonwealth actually achievable in practice" (5).

The author proceeds to trace the history of the more common meanings of equity in English legal history. He points out that the English Common law was extremely strict and equity as accommodation to circumstances became the purview of jurisprudence. In England, the court of equity was the court of Chancery which, according to Majeske, began to see itself as an adversary to the Common Law. Around 1520, the Crown began to use Chancery to overrule the Common Law courts. Majeske argues that early modern England focused on the "flexible" dimension of equity, a dimension amenable to and developed by Christian scholasticism, and ignored the classical, esoteric meaning.

Majeske derives the esoteric meaning from Aristotle's Ethics, citing the passage in which Aristotle refers to equitable persons as those who take less than they deserve. Majeske identifies these equitable persons as those whom Plato and Aristotle described as working to change a regime over generations, and whose goal was the state of perfect equality as in Plato's Republic, even though they were aware that this perfect equality was unachievable (8). Majeske spends pages 39-62 establishing the plausibility of this identification and so sets the stage for interpreting Utopia as a plea for [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in this esoteric sense, that is, that while the perfect equality of communism is unachievable, it should be the goal at which one aims and the standard by which social change is judged.

Majeske begins his commentary on Utopia with an analysis of Bude's letter to Thomas Lupset about Utopia. This letter is reproduced in the Yale edition and is usually read as praise of More's work. Majeske, however, points out that a passage in the center of the letter directly links the criticism of capital punishment for theft to Utopian communism.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Andrew J. Majeske. Equity in English Renaissance Literature: Thomas More and Edmund Spenser
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.