A 21st-Century Civil-Rights Battle; Clinics Practice Insidious Racial, Sex-Based Discrimination

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 20, 2009 | Go to article overview
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A 21st-Century Civil-Rights Battle; Clinics Practice Insidious Racial, Sex-Based Discrimination


Byline: Trent Franks, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The most recent U.S. census reveals that abortion clinics are engaged in an insidious form of racial and sex-based discrimination.

In a report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Columbia University economic researchers Douglas Almond and Lena Edlund said they found a significant gender imbalance between males and females within immigrant populations in the United States, which they think provides evidence of sex-selection, most likely at the prenatal stage.

The data revealed unnatural sex-ratio imbalances within segments of certain immigrant populations, including those originating from India, Vietnam, Thailand, Armenia and especially China, where government-enforced one child policies and a culturally engrained son preference have made sex-selection abortion so prevalent that boys outnumber girls by as much as a 2-to-1 ratio in rural communities.

One Harvard University economist estimated that more than 100 million women were demographically missing from the world because of widespread and underreported practices of prenatal sex selection, an astonishing figure.

Regardless of one's position on abortion, this form of discrimination should horrify every American. The idea of killing a baby simply because she is a girl is reprehensible. Unsurprisingly, a March 2006 Zogby International poll found that 86 percent of Americans supported a prohibition on sex-selection abortion. Indeed, what good are the hard-won liberties of voting and other women's rights if babies may still be aborted simply for being girls?

Ironically, we are doing a better job internationally on this issue than we are at home. At the United Nations' 2007 annual meeting of the Commission on the Status of Women, 51st Session, the U.S. delegation spearheaded a resolution calling on countries to eliminate sex-selective abortion. The commission has urged governments of all nations to take necessary measures to prevent ... prenatal sex selection

Congress also voiced strong disapproval of the practice when 362 members of Congress, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, passed a resolution in 2006 condemning the communist government of China for its one-child policy, which promotes sex-selection abortion and female infanticide on a massive scale, a 'gendercide' which has led to millions of 'missing girls.'" Notwithstanding this widespread revulsion of sex-selection abortion and despite proof it occurs in America, sex-selective abortion remains legal and, therefore, tacitly condoned.

Abortion is being used not only to abort boys and girls just because they are boys and girls. Equally reprehensible is the reality of race-based abortion. Last spring, some federally funded clinics were exposed as agreeing to accept funds from persons who expressly asked that their donations be used to reduce the black population by abortion.

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