Inside Bulldog's Beat Veteran Newsman John Drummond's Second Book Gives Readers a Glimpse into Some the Suburbs' Most Infamous Cases -BYLN- by Christy Gutowski Cgutowski@dailyherald.Com

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 19, 2009 | Go to article overview

Inside Bulldog's Beat Veteran Newsman John Drummond's Second Book Gives Readers a Glimpse into Some the Suburbs' Most Infamous Cases -BYLN- by Christy Gutowski Cgutowski@dailyherald.Com


Veteran Chicago newsman John Drummond was covering the trial of some mob henchman when they started giving the snap-brimmed, stogie-chewing reporter a hard time.

Drummond didnt miss a beat.

"I turned around and said, Hey, were trying to get your point of the story, but you guys arent talking. Ive got a camera guy down in the lobby. Lets settle it right now. Well be glad to talk to you."

The neer-do-wells didnt take Drummond up on his offer.

But during a broadcast career that spanned more than four decades, the straight-talking WBBM-Channel 2 reporter nicknamed "Bulldog" scored the inside scoop on many of the areas most notorious crimes and the thugs who often left behind their fingerprints.

In his second book, "It Aint Pretty, but Its Real," Drummond shares more tales of murder and mayhem in a follow-up to "Thirty Years in the Trenches: Covering Crooks, Characters, and Capers," released in 1998, which sold about 5,000 copies.

"I felt when I finished the first one I still had a lot of good stories to tell," said Drummond, 79, in his trademark baritone voice, before a book signing at the Villa Park library. "Our book has no fabricated quotations. Its all real."

It includes nearly two dozen colorful vignettes, beginning with the haunting 1972 kidnapping of a Hillside police officer who was killed in Villa Park. His murder led to technological advances in suburban police radio equipment.

Drummond shares his encounters with notorious horseman Silas Jayne, who among his long list of crimes was convicted of conspiracy in his brothers October 1970 fatal shooting in Inverness.

Jayne long was rumored to be involved in the still-unsolved 1977 disappearance of candy heiress Helen Vorhees Brach.

"He was a fascinating individual whether you liked him or not," Drummond said. "If you did him wrong, he believed in physical retribution, not litigation; he felt something had to be done and done ruthlessly."

Drummond also tells of other unsolved mysteries he covered, such as when 14-year-old Barbara Glueckert of Mount Prospect vanished in 1976 after attending a rock concert, never to be seen again. In a less notorious case, but just as mysterious, Arlington Heights couple Edward Andrews and his wife, Stephania, disappeared after leaving a cocktail party at the former Sheraton Chicago hotel in 1970. Their bodies still havent been found.

Drummond, a kid from west-central Wisconsin infatuated with Chicagos big city tales and the lure of television, covered crime, politics and sports and had one-on-ones with Presidents Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan.

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Inside Bulldog's Beat Veteran Newsman John Drummond's Second Book Gives Readers a Glimpse into Some the Suburbs' Most Infamous Cases -BYLN- by Christy Gutowski Cgutowski@dailyherald.Com
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