Bus Is Best as Zille Pushes Party Line Back on Home Turf

Cape Times (South Africa), April 22, 2009 | Go to article overview

Bus Is Best as Zille Pushes Party Line Back on Home Turf


BYLINE: Caiphus Kgosana

ADORING crowds flocked to meet Democratic Alliance leader Helen Zille as she criss-crossed Cape Town in an open-top party bus yesterday in a last-ditch bid for votes.

Excited supporters greeted the bus as it made stops on the Cape Flats at Malibu village in Blue Downs, Tafelsig in Mitchells Plain and in Manenberg, its speakers blasting out the strains of Koekie loekie, "Klim op die DA bus" (Ride on the DA bus) and "Dis Zille wat die wind lat waai" (Zille makes the wind blow).

But in New Crossroads, the response was more muted as Zille jived to an Afro-pop song and loudly urged them in isiXhosa to vote for the DA today.

About 400 supporters who had packed the New Life Community church at Malibu village, where the bus made its first stop, mobbed Zille as she alighted from the bus.

The DA leader took to the microphone and immediately taught them a new song. "Die besem, wat doen ons met die besem, ons vee vir Zuma in die see" (The broom, what do we do with the broom, we sweep Zuma into the sea), she sang, much to the crowd's delight.

It is to communities in the predominantly coloured areas of Blue Downs, Mitchells Plain, Manenberg and other parts of the Cape Flats that Zille is looking for votes that will propel her to the premiership of the Western Cape.

Former Western Cape police commissioner and DA member Lennit Max reassured Zille of the community's support in the elections.

Speaking in Afrikaans, Zille told them that, just as she took control of the City of Cape Town in 2006, the DA now needed votes to take the province away from the ANC. …

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