A Disaster for Defense; It's like Making Jane Fonda Senior Adviser on Vietnam

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 24, 2009 | Go to article overview

A Disaster for Defense; It's like Making Jane Fonda Senior Adviser on Vietnam


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

President Obama is surrendering national security with a radical appointment at the Defense Department. Rosa Brooks, this month made adviser to Undersecretary of Defense for Policy Michelle Flournoy, will be in a position to do significant damage to U.S. defense policy.

This position is unknown to most outside the Beltway but is at the critical locus of defense policymaking. The undersecretary for policy's office is the nerve center producing most of the Defense Department's strategic documents and governing policies. According to a George W. Bush-era occupant of that office: If she wanted to write her wacky ideas into policy controlling the entire defense establishment, that would be the place to do it.

A review of Ms. Brooks' published work reveals her hard-left, rabidly ideological positions on defense matters. She regularly referred to Mr. Bush as a war criminal, and argues that Bush-era policies on terrorism - which prevented any major attacks on U.S. soil since Sept. 11, 2001 - made America less secure. Referring to Mr. Bush and former Vice President Richard Cheney, she wrote, They should be treated like psychotics who need treatment. She has called al Qaeda little more than an obscure group of extremist thugs and wrongly predicted that the surge in Iraq was a feckless plan that would prove too little, too late. Putting her in the policy shop is like Lyndon Johnson making Jane Fonda a senior adviser on Vietnam, the former Pentagon adviser says.

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A Disaster for Defense; It's like Making Jane Fonda Senior Adviser on Vietnam
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