The First Hundred Days of Clinton, Reagan and Roosevelt

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 29, 2009 | Go to article overview

The First Hundred Days of Clinton, Reagan and Roosevelt


Byline: John Haydon, Clark Eberly and John Sopko, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

CLINTON

Day 1: Jan. 20, 1993 - William Jefferson Clinton is sworn in as the 42nd president of the United States.

Day 6: Jan. 25 - Mr. Clinton promises to issue an executive order ending the ban on gays in the military and names first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton to head a national task force on health care reform.

Day 10: Jan. 29 - Mr. Clinton orders the military to stop asking recruits whether they are gay and postpones an executive order lifting the ban.

Day 14: Feb. 2 - The White House confirms that the administration is considering a stimulus package of about $30 billion, equally divided between new spending and tax credits.

Day 50: March 10 - A federal judge rules that Mrs. Clinton's health care reform task force must hold its sessions in public.

Day 66: March 26 - The White House releases the names of 511 members of the health care reform task force.

Day 72: April 1 - Senate Republicans block a $16.3 billion economic stimulus bill.

Day 90: April 19 - The FBI shoots a chemical agent into the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas. Eighty-six Davidians, including children, perish in a huge blaze.

Day 92: April 21 - Mr. Clinton accepts defeat of an economic stimulus bill, after failing for a fourth time to break a Republican filibuster in the Senate.

REAGAN

Day 1: Jan. 20, 1981 - Ronald Wilson Reagan is sworn in as the 40th president of the United States.

Day 9: Jan. 28 - Mr. Reagan lifts price controls on domestic oil.

Day 14: Feb. 2 - General Motors Corp. reports its first yearly loss in almost 60 years.

Day 19: Feb. 7 - Mr. Reagan signs legislation raising the national debt ceiling from $935.1 billion to $985 billion. The U.S. unemployment rate is at 7.4 percent.

Day 31: Feb. 19 - Ford Motor Co. reports a full-year loss of $1.54 billion, one of the worst yearly losses in U.S. corporate history.

Day 39: Feb. 27 - Chrysler Corp. is promised $400 million in federal loan guarantees, augmenting aid the company received in 1980.

Day 70: March 30 - Mr. Reagan is shot in the chest after addressing a labor group at the Washington Hilton Hotel. His assailant, John W. Hinckley Jr., also wounds two security men and critically wounds press secretary James Brady.

Day 73: April 2 - The Senate passes a package of $36.9 billion in spending cuts, nearly $3 billion more than had been requested by Mr. Reagan for fiscal 1982.

Day 85: April 14 - The world's first reusable spacecraft, Space Shuttle Columbia, returns from its maiden voyage after 54 hours and 36 orbits of the Earth.

ROOSEVELT

Day 1: March 4, 1933 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt is sworn in as the 32nd president of the United States, marking the last time an inauguration is held on March 4. In his inaugural address, Roosevelt says, The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.

Day 6: March 9 - Congress convenes an emergency session and passes the Emergency Banking Act. …

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