First Committee Recommends Forty-Eight Disarmament Related Texts

UN Chronicle, Spring 1997 | Go to article overview

First Committee Recommends Forty-Eight Disarmament Related Texts


After the General Debate, the Main Committees of the General Assembly began their deliberations, recommending resolutions and decisions for the Assembly to consider in plenary. On 10 December, the Assembly - in expressing its conviction that the continuing existence of nuclear weapons posed a threat to all humanity," and their use would have "catastrophic consequences for all life on Earth" - underlined the unanimous conclusion of the International Court of Justice that there existed an "obligation to pursue in good faith and bring to a conclusion negotiations leading to nuclear disarmament in all its aspects under strict and effective international control".

Acting on the recommendation of its First Committee (Disarmament and International Security), the Assembly, by resolution 51/45 M, also called upon all States to fulfil that obligation immediately and expressed appreciation to the Court for responding to its request, made in resolution 49/75 K of 15 December 1994, to render an advisory opinion on whether the threat or use of nuclear weapons is permitted in any circumstance under international law.

By resolution 51/45 O, the Assembly urged the nuclear-weapon States to "stop immediately the qualitative improvement, development and stockpiling of nuclear warheads and delivery systems", and to undertake the "step-by-step reduction of the nuclear threat and a phased programme of progressive and balanced deep reductions of nuclear weapons", with a view to their total elimination within a time-bound framework.

In other resolutions on nuclear disarmament, the Assembly called for the pursuit by nuclear-weapon States of"systematic and progressive efforts to reduce nuclear weapons globally" (51/45 G), and reiterated its request to the Conference on Disarmament to "commence negotiations, in order to reach agreement on an international convention prohibiting the use of nuclear weapons under any circumstances", and proposed a draft as a possible basis for that agreement (51/46 D).

Two texts, although they differed on the pace of nuclear disarmament and the recognition of existing agreements, dealt with bilateral nuclear-arms negotiations. Resolution 51/45 R encouraged the Russian Federation, the United States, Belarus, Kazakstan and Ukraine to continue cooperative efforts aimed at eliminating nuclear weapons and strategic offensive arms. Resolution 51/45 1 called upon the Russian Federation and the United States to "accord the highest priority" to their "work for deep reductions in their nuclear armaments".

Five texts were devoted to nuclear-weapon-free zones. In resolution 51/45 B, the Assembly called upon States parties and signatories to the treaties establishing such zones in Latin America and the Caribbean, the South Pacific, South-East Asia and Africa to "explore and implement further ways and means of cooperation, including the consolidation of the status of the nuclear-weapon-free southern hemisphere and adjacent areas".

By resolution 51/42, the Assembly reaffirmed its endorsement of the concept of a nuclear-weapon-free zone in South Asia and welcomed the support of all five nuclear-weapon States for the proposal. It also urged all concerned parties to consider taking the steps needed to establish a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the Middle East (51/41); called upon African States to sign and ratify the African Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone Treaty (51/53); and welcomed recent steps for consolidation of the regime of military denuclearization established by the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (51/52).

By resolution 51/48, the Assembly called upon Israel to accede without further delay to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and place its nuclear facilities under the safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

In resolution 51/43, the Assembly reaffirmed the need to reach an early agreement on security arrangements for non-nuclear-weapon States against the use or threat of use of nuclear weapons, and appealed to all States, especially the nuclear-weapon States, to work towards a common approach or formula for a legally binding international instrument. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

First Committee Recommends Forty-Eight Disarmament Related Texts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.