Gazing into the Future

By Reese, Susan | Techniques, May 2009 | Go to article overview

Gazing into the Future


Reese, Susan, Techniques


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"We cannot always build the future for our youth, but we can build our youth for the future." Franklin D. Roosevelt spoke those words more than 50 years ago. It was a time when students took classes called "shop," and those students were almost exclusively boys. Home economics classes, on the other hand, were filled with girls learning cooking and sewing. Business classes often meant typing and shorthand for girls, while mostly boys learned about farming in the classes devoted to agriculture education. Extracurricular activities meant clubs such as 4-H, Future Farmers of America and Future Homemakers of America. All of these activities provided students with the skills they needed for the world in which they lived, but that world has changed, and so has the education they receive. Change was necessary so that we could continue, as Roosevelt encouraged, building our youth for the future.

Today, "vocational education" is "career and technical education," and students are learning about engineering, computers, information technology, health sciences, business and marketing, and a number of trades and industries. Future Farmers of America is now the National FFA Organization, and Future Homemakers of America has become Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America. Neither the Career and Technical Student Organizations nor the classes are as sharply divided along gender lines as they were 50 years ago. The changes in the career and technical education (CTE) classroom have been dramatic, but what will that classroom look like 50 years from now?

Each year since 1985, the editors of The Futurist, which is published by the World Future Society, have selected for their "Outlook" report what they call the most thought-provoking ideas and forecasts that appeared in the magazine during the year. Number four on the Futurist's Outlook 2009 list is, "Careers, and the college majors for preparing for them, are becoming more specialized." Students are beginning to explore what the magazine calls "niche majors," such as sustainable business, strategic intelligence, entrepreneurship, neuroscience and nanotechnology, computer and digital forensics, and comic book art.

At number six on the list is another education-related item. "Professional knowledge will become obsolete almost as quickly as it's acquired." Rapid changes such as new technologies will mean continuous education and retraining and lead to a substantial portion of the labor force being in job retraining programs at any given time. If that prediction holds true--and it certainly seems logical--then career and technical educators are going to be very busy in the future, both teaching and learning.

Preparing for the Future Now

James Canton, author of such books as The Extreme Future: The Top Trends That Will Reshape the World in the 21st Century and Technofutures: How Leading-Edge Innovations Will Transform Business in the 21st Century, is known as a global futurist. In fact, he is the CEO and chairman of a think tank known as the Institute for Global Futures. Canton says there are things we should be doing now to be prepared for the future. One of those is rethinking education, including educating for the high-tech jobs of tomorrow, and teaching about diverse cultures and entrepreneurship, as well as building understanding about globalization and trade. "... and bringing down education costs is a good beginning," adds Canton.

Canton also believes that health care needs some 21st century transformation, and notes, "Eliminating the waste, using IT to make health care efficient and preparing for the post-genomic and personalized health care era is a good start."

Canton has a list of "The Top 10 Trends of the Extreme Future," and these include a future of energy alternatives such as hydrogen; medicine that is radically altered by nanotech, neurotech and genomics; security from threats such as terrorists and hackers; and dealing with an environment that includes global warming, pollution . …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Gazing into the Future
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.