Reforming the Corps: With a Backlog of Projects and Dismal History, the Army Corps of Engineers Needs an Overhaul

By Shuler, Brandon D. | E Magazine, March-April 2009 | Go to article overview

Reforming the Corps: With a Backlog of Projects and Dismal History, the Army Corps of Engineers Needs an Overhaul


Shuler, Brandon D., E Magazine


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The stated purpose of the The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is to "provide vital public engineering services in peace and war to strengthen our nation's security, engage the economy and reduce risks from disasters." However, as George Sorvalis, Corps Reform Network coordinator for the National Wildlife Federation points out, "the Corps currently has $81 billion of congressionally authorized, but not-yet-constructed projects on the books and a construction budget of only $2 billion per year. Because of this huge project backlog, many of our nation's most pressing water infrastructure needs are not being met."

Environmental advocates say the Corps is in need of a serious overhaul. In November 2008, close to 30 of the nation's leading environmental groups presented their recommendations to President Obama in the report "Transition to Green" (see also "The Green Roadmap," page 28.). In it, they highlighted three approaches to improving the Corps: restoration, reform and regulation.

Under restoration, the report said the "new" Corps should maintain as its highest priority "the protection and restoration of healthy, fully functioning ecosystems and their associated ecological services" and that "projects should be designed for ecosystem restoration and protection projects, backed by credible science and sufficiently funded." With the encroaching seas reclaiming more and more beachfront habitat, restoration, commonly referred to as beach replenishment, must be scientifically supported.

The Water Resources Development Act of 2007 already "requires the Corps to implement a number of reforms that are important for the health, safety and welfare of people and wildlife." Sorvalis says that "working with natural systems instead of against them, restoration projects and other nonstructural engineering solutions help fish and wildlife thrive, provide clean water, improve economies and help communities withstand the more severe weather linked to climate change. "However," he adds, "the Corps often overlooks restoration projects and nonstructural solutions, the projects do not receive the priority funding needed, and are failing to move forward fast enough."

Prioritizing Waterways

The struggling economy gives President Obama a great opportunity to create infrastructure jobs. In December 2008, he announced he was going to create three million new jobs and use infrastructure construction as one of the largest components of his plan. The "Transition to Green" report suggests that in the first 100 days the president "issue an executive order on ecosystem restoration, including the creation of the Office of Ecosystem Restoration at the Council on Environmental Quality, and highlight ecosystem restoration funding in the President's budget proposal. …

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Reforming the Corps: With a Backlog of Projects and Dismal History, the Army Corps of Engineers Needs an Overhaul
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