APHA Affiliates Bringing Public Health Education to Undergrads

By Johnson, Teddi Dineley | The Nation's Health, May 2009 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

APHA Affiliates Bringing Public Health Education to Undergrads


Johnson, Teddi Dineley, The Nation's Health


A nationwide movement to bring public health education to the nation's 6 million undergraduate students is growing stronger, thanks to a pilot program launched this spring by APHA's Committee on Affiliates.

As part of CoA's new Connecting with the Colleges initiative, a handful of APHA-affiliated state public health associations are bringing public health professionals together with local colleges and universities. Efforts vary widely as Affiliate leaders sift through opportunities to foster public health education, but all share a common goal of developing undergraduate public health education in the classroom and in the community.

"Instead of one common approach, there are different approaches," said APHA member Marc Hiller, DrPH, MPH, who is leading the New England effort.

CoA's effort to bring public health professionals together with local colleges and universities is rooted in a 2003 Institute of Medicine report, "Who Will Keep the Public Healthy?" which recommended that all undergraduate students should have access to education in public health.

The United States is home to more than 100 graduate-level schools and accredited programs in public health, the majority of which already offer introductory public health courses to undergraduates. However, at least 1,900 U.S. undergraduate institutions are reportedly without schools or programs in public health.

"This is an activity ready to happen," said Richard Riegelman, MD, PhD, MPH, professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at George Washington University's School of Public Health and Health Services, who is working with the Affiliate initiative.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"There are practitioners with expertise and faculty who are receptive at the universities, and students who are dying to get involved."

In New England, the Maine Public Health Association is joining in the effort, focusing on strengthening the public health work force, "and among those topics is the value and the importance of undergraduate public health education as a potential gateway for professional development for public health in the state," Hiller said.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

APHA Affiliates Bringing Public Health Education to Undergrads
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?