Why Creative Thinking? It Makes Business Sense! Prith Biant, Founder of Creatives-Training Outlines the Positive Benefits to Businesses of Thinking 'Outside the Box'

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), May 15, 2009 | Go to article overview

Why Creative Thinking? It Makes Business Sense! Prith Biant, Founder of Creatives-Training Outlines the Positive Benefits to Businesses of Thinking 'Outside the Box'


HOW we think is something most people take for granted and rarely stop to ponder, tending instead to fall into a set pattern of thinking. However, the way we think directly affects the way we respond to everyday situations and deal with problems. The same applies in business. Creative thinking is all about side stepping these set patterns of thought and generating new and dynamic ideas for products, improved services, and problem solving.

As business owner/managers, if we have a problem, we usually call a meeting and seek to find a solution by the end of it. We look at what has worked in the past and use this to help solve the problem. Creativity questions this; in fact, it goes further by saying, actually that probably won't work because times have changed - you need to think up something new.

New?! How will we know if it will work if we haven't done it before? Creativity is about taking risks, learning from experience and being brave enough to go where others haven't gone before.

Creativity and innovation are often associated with big technological companies such as Orange, Samsung and Hewlett Packard. But creativity is useful, if not essential, to all areas - from hospitals and social services departments to job centres, charities and small businesses. Each sector has its own particular set of challenges that require creative thinking.

We are currently working with Tydfil Training, a successful organisation delivering a range of training programs for unemployed people in the Merthyr area.

Following the success of adopting creative thinking solutions at management level, the company has now begun rolling out a tailored creative thinking course for all staff; implementing tools and techniques for problem solving and ideas generation into team meetings and strategy sessions.

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Why Creative Thinking? It Makes Business Sense! Prith Biant, Founder of Creatives-Training Outlines the Positive Benefits to Businesses of Thinking 'Outside the Box'
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