Unattractive Union: It Is Now Clear That European Nations Were Deceived into Joining an Economic Union That Became a Political Union, Yet Our Leaders Still Seek a Similar Economic Union with the EU

By Perloff, James | The New American, May 11, 2009 | Go to article overview
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Unattractive Union: It Is Now Clear That European Nations Were Deceived into Joining an Economic Union That Became a Political Union, Yet Our Leaders Still Seek a Similar Economic Union with the EU


Perloff, James, The New American


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THE NEW AMERICAN has devoted extensive coverage to the risks of what critics have dubbed a North American Union (NAU), in reference to the incremental integration of the United States with Mexico and Canada. The foundation for such a union was initiated with the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, which went into effect on January 1, 1994. Like the older European Common Market that eventually morphed into the EU, NAFTA, a supposed "free trade" arrangement, provided the supranational architecture for future integration.

This process of North American integration was later advanced through the "Security and Prosperity Partnership" (SPP) that President George W. Bush, Mexican President Vicente Fox, and Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin launched at their Waco, Texas, meeting on March 23, 2005. *

Few Americans are aware of the SPP arrangement because the major media ignored it--except for CNN's Lou Dobbs, who said of the Waco meeting: "President Bush signed a formal agreement that will end the United States as we know it, and he took the step without approval from either the U.S. Congress or the people of the United States."

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It soon became apparent that the plan would lead to eventual political consolidation of the countries, modeled on the European Union. It would destroy U.S. sovereignty, nullify the Constitution, flood our nation with cheap, job-destroying imports via a NAFTA "Super Highway," and allow uncontrolled immigration by erasing our border with Mexico.

Thanks to the vigilance of concerned activists, the alarm bells reached the halls of Congress, and in 2007 Rep. Virgil Goode (R-Va.) introduced House Concurrent Resolution 40, which resolved that

(1) the United States should not engage in the construction of a North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Superhighway System; [and]

(2) the United States should not allow the Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP) to implement further regulations that would create a North American Union with Mexico and Canada.

Robert Pastor of the ultra-establishment Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is considered by many to have fathered the concepts that resulted in the SPR But writing in the July/August 2008 issue of Foreign Affairs (the CFR's journal), Pastor registered disappointment with its progress. Though continuing to advocate continental unification, he lamented that "North America's experiment in integration has stalled.... The April summit meeting [between U.S., Mexican, and Canadian heads of state] was probably the last hurrah for the SPP. The strategy of acting on technical issues in an incremental, bureaucratic way, and of keeping the issues away from public view, has generated more suspicion than accomplishments. The new president will probably discard the SPP."

But like a running back who, about to be tackled, laterals the football to a teammate, the establishment has at least for the time being shifted to another scheme: cementing the United States to the European Union in what is called the "Transatlantic Partnership."

Early rumblings of this partnership came in 2003 when the U.S. Department of Commerce stated in a press release: "Commerce Secretary Don Evans and his European Union counterpart, Commissioner Erkki Liikanen, reaffirmed the importance of the transatlantic economic and commercial partnership at a meeting last night in Washington, D.C."

These sentiments were quietly certified in November of that year when the U.S. House of Representatives passed House Resolution 390, introduced by Nebraska Republican Doug Bereuter. The resolution declared that the "United States and the European community are aware of their shared responsibility, not only to further transatlantic security, but to address other common interests such as environmental protection, poverty reduction, combating international crime and promoting human rights, and to work together to meet those transnational challenges which affect the well-being of all.

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Unattractive Union: It Is Now Clear That European Nations Were Deceived into Joining an Economic Union That Became a Political Union, Yet Our Leaders Still Seek a Similar Economic Union with the EU
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