ICT Attitudinal Characteristics and Use Level of Nigerian Teachers

By Jegede, Philip Olu | Issues in Informing Science & Information Technology, Annual 2008 | Go to article overview

ICT Attitudinal Characteristics and Use Level of Nigerian Teachers


Jegede, Philip Olu, Issues in Informing Science & Information Technology


Introduction

Information and Communication Technology has enhanced teachers' professional knowledge, skill, and capabilities by extending their subject knowledge, enabling planning and preparation for teaching to be more efficient (Leach, 2005). Research has also shown that ICT enables effective learning (Sutton, 2006). As a result of this, ICT is now recognized as an essential ingredient for creating 21st century learning environment. Educators worldwide are now harnessing the power of technology to transform learning and enhance results.

To foster classroom ICT integration, teachers have been identified to be a major factor in fostering classroom integration. This is because teachers constitute the facilitators and entrepreneurs in classroom ICT learning environment. For this reason, research efforts have concentrated on teacher-related factors such as ICT attitudes, self-efficacy, competence, etc. This is with the belief that each of this ICT-related behaviour will impact ICT use. For example Yuen, Law, and Chen (1999) identified teachers' positive attitude toward computers as an important factor in fostering computer integration and the enhancement of quality learning and teaching using computers. Kenzie, Delecourt, and Power (1994) opined that computer self-efficacy predicted computer use. Similarly, individuals who did not see themselves as competent ICT users were less likely to use ICT, in other words, competence is related to usage.

The missing fact in these findings is that the relationships between the constructs of each of these ICT behaviour components were not investigated. This may obscure important information and facts that may be needed in remedying identified problems. This information is what this study attempts to provide.

Previous endeavours in this context have investigated constructs of ICT attitudes and each of self-efficacy and competence (Jegede, 2007; Jegede, Dibu-Ojerinde, & Ilori, 2007). What is yet to be added is the answer to the question: What relationship exists between each of ICT attitudinal constructs and use level of teachers?

Use level in this context implies the extent to which teachers use ICT for personal and professional practices. Chin and Marcolin (2007) emphasized the need for examining the actual phenomena of ICT usage. Phenomena of usage according to authors encompassed ICT usage pattern, quality of usage and quantity of usage. The present study measures usage in quantitative and qualitative terms. Teachers in this study were those involved in pre-service teacher training institution in Nigeria, such as Colleges of Education and Universities' Faculties of Education.

The reason for choosing these populations is because good ICT behaviour when achieved among teacher educators will eventually be achieved on the student-teachers they teach. Thus tomorrow's ICT classroom environment will be guaranteed through these means. This is in consonance with Oliver (1994) who posited that unless student teachers have ICT role models, it will be impossible for them to integrate ICT into teaching. The sole objective of the study therefore is to ascertain the nature of relationship that exists between ICT attitudinal constructs and use level of teachers.

Method

Participants and Setting

Four hundred and sixty seven teachers selected from ten teacher education institutions (five Colleges of Education and five Universities) participated in the study. The sample covers all teaching cadre and subject discipline. Two research instruments were employed to collect relevant data. These included Teachers ICT Attitudinal Scale (TICTAS) designed by Selwyn (1987) but adapted by Soh (1998) and Teachers' Use of ICT Checklist (TUIC). TICTAS is a 21-item five-point Likert scale with five constructs namely; affective components, perceived usefulness factor, behavioural factor, perceived control factor and defense factor. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

ICT Attitudinal Characteristics and Use Level of Nigerian Teachers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.