It Sure wouldnAEt Hurt for Reinsdorf to Consider This

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 1, 2009 | Go to article overview

It Sure wouldnAEt Hurt for Reinsdorf to Consider This


There probably has-nAEt been a franchise owner in the last couple of decades who has made a more concerted effort at bringing home the fan favorites than Jerry Reinsdorf.

He hasnAEt just made it a hobby. Reinsdorf has made it an organizational mandate.

He has included ex-players in the front office and on the field.

He has put them in the dugout and placed them on the coaching staff.

He has reserved spots in the broadcast booth and held jobs open for them in the minors.

Reinsdorf has buried hatchets, overturned laws, and repatriated the exiled.

With precious few exceptions, Reinsdorf has forgiven nearly everyone with whom he ever traded harsh words, and so itAEs time he got a kind word to Frank Thomas with the following message: come home.

No, no oneAEs forgetting all the bridges Thomas has burned. LetAEs be honest, the guy drops a lit match on wood every time he sets foot on the other side.

True, he has said and done as many dumb things as just about any superstar the White Sox have ever had wear the uniform.

And, yes, the only time he opened his mouth here between meals was to snack, and it was usually on his own foot.

But all that said, he might just be the best right-handed hitter in the history of baseball, at least among those who didnAEt get caught using boosters, and heAEs almost certainly the best hitter in the history of the franchise.

So itAEs time to bring him home.

Bring him home and give him a day.

Bring him home and retire his number, and let him end his career wearing the black and white.

If it canAEt be done before September, thatAEs understandable, so bring him home when the rosters expand, let him hit one more home run on the South Side, and let the fans say goodbye to him in proper fashion.

This wouldnAEt be possible if Thomas, at any point, had criticized Ozzie Guillen, but Thomas was very careful u and wise u never to knock the volatile Sox manager, who has so much ammunition to use against Thomas that the fireworks show would have shocked and awed even those accustomed to verbal bombs bursting in South Side air.

But he didnAEt. After GM Ken

Williams went out of his way to praise Thomas when the Sox let him go following the World Series, Thomas waited a few months and then let fly with some arrows at Reinsdorf and Williams u and it was Williams who responded with a barrage against Thomas. …

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It Sure wouldnAEt Hurt for Reinsdorf to Consider This
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