Electronic Information and Records Manager

By Hinneberg, Nancy B.; Coyghlin, Amy W. | Records Management Quarterly, October 1997 | Go to article overview

Electronic Information and Records Manager


Hinneberg, Nancy B., Coyghlin, Amy W., Records Management Quarterly


LAN/WANs, reengineering, imaging, EDI, process improvement, Internet, E-mail! Today's changing world of high tech and electronic information has many new "buzz words" and many challenging opportunities for records and information management professionals.

The Wisconsin Electric Power Co. is a wholly owned gas and electric subsidiary of Wisconsin Energy, headquartered in downtown Milwaukee. The corporation has approximately 4,000 employees serving 2.3 million people in its service territory ranging from southeastern Wisconsin to the Fox Valley area and into Upper Michigan.

About three years ago, Wisconsin Electric experienced "revitalization" - a euphemism for reduction in force. Business units were formed to reflect the core operations of the business; corporate support areas continued to be known as departments. A 33 percent reduction in the Corporate Records Management staff occurred and the Corporate Secretary's area (formerly known as Information Systems) was reorganized to become the Information Resources Department.

ROLE OF THE INFORMATION MANAGER

Because of the strong emphasis on electronic information, the records and information manager now had to work with the traditionally technical information resources personnel. Although not realized at first, the combination of records management and information systems was the best thing that could have happened for the advancement of information management. Each benefited as one became more aware of the need for basic records management concepts and the other became more knowledgeable and comfortable with the technical aspects and potential of electronic information management.

Unfortunately, the records management/information systems relationship does not evolve naturally in most organizations and must sometimes travel a very rocky road. The Information Systems Department traditionally has been seen as having great influence and high budgets within the corporation, whereas the records management program generally has had low budgets/low priority and is located in the basement.

In order for the relationship to be successful, records and information management professionals must be very proactive in pursuing changes. If an opportunity arises that has records implications, the information manager must step in and offer to either expand or provide new services.

As a result of the improved working relationship with information systems, the records management program at Wisconsin Electric has grown, taken on a new role, and changed its name to Corporate Information Management (CIM). CIM is now involved with areas not associated with traditional records management, such as E-mail retention, systems design and LAN directory structures. These projects involve issues at the corporate level, and communication plans must be developed that address the needs of the entire organization.

THE IMPORTANCE OF MANAGING ELECTRONIC INFORMATION

Many people believe that the longer they retain records, the better. In the paper world, space is a limiting factor. In the electronic world, however, space seems limitless. Information managers must get the message out that because of "discovery," records retained longer than legally and operationally required become a potential liability to the organization.

The document discovery process (wherein your opponent in litigation gets to see your records and vice versa) dramatically changed with the introduction of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure #26. The rule states that an organization must provide "a copy of, or description by category and location of, all documents, data compilations and tangible things in the possession, custody or control of the party relevant to the disputed facts alleged with particularity in the pleadings." Prior to this rule, the interested parties were required to specify which documents to produce. Now an open-ended request is legitimate and must be met Therefore, in the event of litigation, all pertinent records would need to be submitted. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Electronic Information and Records Manager
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.