George Eliot and 'The Jewish Question'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 2, 2009 | Go to article overview

George Eliot and 'The Jewish Question'


Byline: Caitrin Nicol, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Mary Ann Evans, who later would become known as the novelist George Eliot (1819-1880), announced at the age of 22 that she would no longer be attending church. The evangelical flame of her adolescence had burned down to agnosticism; as she explained in a letter to her heartsick father, while I admire and cherish much of what I believe to have been the moral teaching of Jesus himself, I consider the system of doctrines built upon the facts of his life and drawn as to its materials from Jewish notions to be most dishonorable to God and most pernicious in its influence on individual and social happiness.

She became only more critical as time went on, remarking elsewhere that Judaism is estimable only insofar as Christ transcended it, and Christianity insofar as it transcended Christ, like turtle soup without turtle. Yet her final novel, Daniel Deronda (1876), sympathetically features the quest of its title character, unknowingly born a Jew, to discover and embrace his birthright and seek a political destiny for his people in Palestine.

Eliot, a leading female intellectual who opposed women's suffrage and an archmoralist who lived openly with a married man for decades, was a mass of such apparent contradictions. She also was a writer of disarming clarity, as is her latest interpreter, Gertrude Himmelfarb. Miss Himmelfarb, in characteristically diamond-cutting prose, takes up the riddle of Eliot's special interest in Jewish renewal and nationhood long before Zionism even had a name. The Jewish Odyssey of George Eliot is a masterful and many-faceted account of Eliot's influences, sources, historical surroundings, changing views and latter-day defense of Judaism.

Miss Himmelfarb has done more to redeem the Victorians in modern eyes than any other historian, though Eliot needs little redemption. But while the Jewish question engaged Eliot, she mainly failed to make it interesting to non-Jewish readers. Daniel Deronda was met with disappointment at the time and has been neglected ever since, with most critics balking at the strong Jew element.

A secondary, gentile protagonist, the spirited and spoiled Gwendolen Harleth, has captured most of the attention; her costly development of a moral imagination (to borrow a favorite phrase of Miss Himmelfarb's) is Eliot in fine form - a consummate expert in the pathology of conscience, as Lord Acton called her. F.R. Leavis even set about to liberate the English half and publish it as Harleth, though at the last moment, the publisher thought better of it.

Conversely, soon after Daniel Deronda's publication, a Hebrew translation was produced without the Gwendolen distraction, and a selection of just the philosophical discussions was passed around enthusiastically in Lemberg.

I meant everything in the book to be related to everything else, Eliot rebuked the cherry-pickers. Miss Himmelfarb hints at some crossover themes, but one only wishes she had made a more determined inquiry into these relationships. Daniel Deronda is a study in subjection: chosen and forced, stifling and sublime, in human bonds and in adherence to the demands of a larger calling. It is at the level of the bonds between individual characters - bonds that by necessity involve an element of service - that Eliot, the exquisite psychologist, lays the foundation for the relation of individuals to their religious and national identity. …

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