Screen Test: Video Games Dominate Britain's Entertainment Industry, Yet We Lack the Critical Vocabulary to Understand Them Properly. It's Time for a Change, Argues Tom Chatfield

By Chatfield, Tom | New Statesman (1996), May 4, 2009 | Go to article overview

Screen Test: Video Games Dominate Britain's Entertainment Industry, Yet We Lack the Critical Vocabulary to Understand Them Properly. It's Time for a Change, Argues Tom Chatfield


Chatfield, Tom, New Statesman (1996)


Cultural realities tend to lag behind economic ones. How else to explain that the UK's biggest (worth [pounds sterling]4.5bn-plus in annual sales) and fastest-growing (at close to 20 per cent annually) entertainment medium still barely registers on the nation's more rarefied intellectual radar? I am talking, of course, about video games--as the field of interactive entertainment still rather quaintly tends to be known. And the reason for its neglect is not so much snobbery as a gaping absence in our critical vocabulary and sensibilities.

When, today, we ask a question such as "Is it art?" we are no longer looking for a yes or no answer. The 20th century decided that urinals, cans of soup, recorded silence, heaps of bricks and fake human excrement could all be art, of a certain kind. Under these circumstances, it would be more than a little perverse to deny the idea of art to objects as lovingly crafted, as considered and as creative as video games. The question that's really at stake is something more specific. If video games are art, what kind of art are they? What are their particular attributes and potential? And, perhaps most importantly, just how good are they?

I recently posed similar questions to someone who is very definitely both an artist and a gamer: the writer Naomi Alderman. Alderman's first novel, Disobedience, appeared in 2006 and won her the Orange Award for New Writers. In parallel to her work as a literary writer, however, she also spent three years pursuing a very different kind of career; that of lead writer on the experimental "alternate reality" game Perplex City. To many authors, such a venture might have felt like a period of time away from "real" writing. Yet, Alderman explained, for her it was more a discovery that these two modes of writing were not only compatible, but symbiotic. I asked her whether she had preferred working on her novel or on the game. "I couldn't choose," she said. "I feel that if I were to give up either the novel or the game, I wouldn't be able to do the other."

It's a creative interconnection Alderman traces back to her childhood. "My first memory of playing a game was around 1981, when my mum took me to the Puffin Club exhibition, a kind of road-show for kids who read books published by Puffin. I remember they had a bank of computers at this one where you could queue up to get ten minutes playing a text-based adventure game. And I thought, 'This is absolutely brilliant.' I was fascinated." These games were some of the first things it was possible to play on a computer in which plot and character meant more than a handful of pixels dashing across the screen. For Alderman, as for many others, the experience was closely associated "with stories and with the idea of being able to walk into a story". And the dizzying kind of thought experiment that the best fiction can undertake--its gleeful defiance of the rules of time and nature--lies close to the heart of what video games do best.

As a modern example, Alderman describes a game called Katamari. In it, for want of a better description, you roll stuff up. You control, she tells me, "a little ball, which is effectively sticky, and you're rolling it around a landscape picking stuff up. As you do so, your ball gets bigger and bigger. It's almost impossible to explain how much fun this is, the pleasure of growing your little ball, which starts off just big enough to pick up pins and sweets from a tabletop and ends up picking envelopes, then televisions, then tables, then houses, then streets; until in the end you can roll it across the whole world picking up clouds and continents."

Katamari may sound like an oddity, but its pleasures are typical of a central kind of video-game experience, in that they are in part architectural: something one inhabits and encounters incrementally; a space designed to be occupied and experienced rather than viewed simply as a whole. Players in a well-made game will relish not just its appearance but also the feel of exploring and gradually mastering its unreal space. …

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