You've Got What You Want, Girls. Stop Whining; Has Feminism Made Women Unhappy? Well, THIS Certainly Will

Daily Mail (London), June 4, 2009 | Go to article overview

You've Got What You Want, Girls. Stop Whining; Has Feminism Made Women Unhappy? Well, THIS Certainly Will


Byline: by Neil Lyndon

ONE of these days, women really ought to make up their minds about what it is exactly they want. Then they could do us all a big favour by stating, unequivocally, what they have decided it is they want.

And then they could cover themselves with glory by sticking to what they say. In other words, it's about time women -- especially their selfappointed mouthpieces -- started behaving like fully grown-up adults and citizens.

Or is that asking too much? Apparently, it is. A survey published this week tells us that women today are far from happy with their lot and wish they could live more like their mothers and grandmothers -- not having to work so much and free to spend more time with their children.

The survey, The Paradox Of Declining Female Happiness, reports that women of all ages and income are less happy than women of 40 years ago and less happy than today's men.

Despite sexual and marital liberation, massively increased career opportunities and earning power, educational privileges and the wholesale demolition of the inhibiting conventions that restricted the lives of women in the past, today's women report themselves as feeling a low sense 'of life satisfaction and well-being'.

Well, men might be entitled to retort, welcome to the real world, sweethearts. What you are complaining about is the very same life that you promoted and celebrated when you were swanking around chanting 'sisters are doing it for themselves'.

One woman commentator perfectly expressed the problem, explaining: 'It's almost as if, in some ways, we got it all and then found out it wasn't quite exactly what we wanted.'

THIS is exactly what I have been predicting -- against a torrent of vilification and derision from feminists -- for more than 20 years.

My book, No More Sex War: The Failures Of Feminism, was not only the first radical, egalitarian, progressive critique of the ideology of feminism (the last and most durable of the 20th century's false secular faiths, like the Marxism from which it drew its cardinal tenets).

The book also analysed in detail the intolerable consequences that were bound to result for women if they were expected both to contribute substantial earnings to family life and, at the same time, be solely or even chiefly responsible for child-care.

It has been obvious to me for some 25 years that social and political equality for women (which I unreservedly welcome) could not work unless men became equal as parents at home.

The selfish, conceited, mandespising yet predatory 'have-itall' feminism of the Cosmopolitans was always a recipe for insupportable burdens for women, for intolerable stress, for a self-rebuking, guilt-laden failure to cope and, in the end, for being downright miserable about it all.

The fact is, lady, if you do succeed in having it all, the effort and the burden will probably break your back.

Before we sympathise with this sad plight, however, perhaps we should remind ourselves of the multitude of unprecedented benefits, blessings and advantages that have been showered upon the modern women who are now whingeing about the poverty of their 'life satisfaction'. …

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You've Got What You Want, Girls. Stop Whining; Has Feminism Made Women Unhappy? Well, THIS Certainly Will
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