Technology Integration during Student Teaching: A Case Study

By Supon, Vi; Ruffini, Michael | College Student Journal, June 2009 | Go to article overview

Technology Integration during Student Teaching: A Case Study


Supon, Vi, Ruffini, Michael, College Student Journal


This article represents a study at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania where secondary and elementary education pre-service teachers were surveyed to determine their usage of various technologies during student teaching. Described are the results and analysis relative to what technologies are enhancing the learning of students in academic environments.

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Educators at all levels need to recognize the impact of technology and how it has reinvented knowledge. According to Willis and Raines (2008):

   Clearly, we are finding that technology
   in pre-service teacher
   education, as well as in society at
   large, is a powerful vehicle for
   change. It has become a catalyst for
   challenging our attitudes, long-held
   beliefs about the way things have
   always been done, classroom practices,
   and the way students learn.
   Our future teachers will be in classrooms
   full of the "N-Gen" (Internet
   Generation) who have grown up in
   a digital world, (p. 5)

Integration is using technology that is infused within method courses in the colleges of education (Honawar, 2008; Lipscomb & Doppen, (2005). Integrating instructional technology possesses potential for helping teachers and students. Churma (1999, p. 10) relates that "teachers can integrate technology into the management of their classroom for electronic grade books, electronic communications, word processing and other such tasks." Swain (2008) emphatically states that we are now in an era where pre-service teachers "must move beyond this point to more advanced stages that will lead to changes in daily teacher practice." The author specifically points out that we must have preservice teachers be the "producers of education" versus the "consumers of education" (p. 6). Further, it must be related that while various technologies and media are simply tools to enhance and facilitate instruction delivery (Lever-Dufry & McDonald, 2008, p. 61), it must be infused purposefully for students "to absorb and retain what they have learned" (Honawar, 2008, p. 28). The integration of technology into teacher education programs shall be based on evidence of what technologies are enhancing the learning of students in academic environments.

Purpose of the Study

The purpose of this study was to determine technology integration during 15 weeks (Spring 2008) for 143 student teachers during their clinical experiences in inclusionary settings. The Technology Integration During Student Teaching Study provided insights and information relative to Bloomsburg University's preservice education program and indicated how various aspects of instructional technology occurred when student teachers were doing their clinical experiences. Grades K through 12, in inclusionary classrooms. "The idea is not only to teach them how to use the hardware and software, but how to integrate it seamlessly into the curriculum" (Willis & Raines, 2008, p. 2 citing Siegel, 1994). Further, the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) established a set of guidelines for preservice teachers with competencies for technology education to prepare teachers. The American Association of College for Teacher Education (2008) points out that ISTE:

   Released new technology standards
   for teachers June 30, updating those
   originally issued in 2000. The new
   National Educational Technology
   Standards address what K- 12 teachers
   should know and be able to do
   "to promote students' abilities to
   learn effectively and live productively
   in an increasingly digital
   world." The standards are organized
   into five categories, each with a set
   of performance indicators and
   rubrics, (p. 7)

The results from this study will assist with curriculum enhancement and noted strategies for student teachers to increase technology usage purposefully in their instruction. …

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