What President Obama's Economic Agenda Means for You: Within Its First 100 Days, the New Administration Has Sought to Restore America with a Series of Financial Initiatives. Whether You're Job Hunting, Trying to Buy a Home, or Find Capital for Your Business, Our Editors Tell You How to Access the Resources You Need

Black Enterprise, June 2009 | Go to article overview

What President Obama's Economic Agenda Means for You: Within Its First 100 Days, the New Administration Has Sought to Restore America with a Series of Financial Initiatives. Whether You're Job Hunting, Trying to Buy a Home, or Find Capital for Your Business, Our Editors Tell You How to Access the Resources You Need


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IN HIS FIRST THREE MONTHS IN OFFICE, PRESIDENT Barack Obama has transformed government into an activist tool that seeks to help American citizens recapture their share of the American dream. Not since Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal or Lyndon B. Johnson's Great Society has an administration acted so boldly and swiftly to rebuild a nation. The result has been a mix of programs--the centerpiece of which is the $787 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, commonly referred to as the stimulus package or bill, which intends to kick-start the economy by providing new jobs, tax breaks, and help for small businesses in addition to extending unemployment and health benefits. According to Recovery.gov, billions have already been dispersed to state and local agencies to engage in projects such as infrastructure repair, environmental cleanup, educational reform, and emergency assistance to disadvantaged families. In a conference call in March, White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel and Senior Advisor and Assistant to the President Valerie Jarrett asserted that citizens must be participants in the process and actively seek out programs and services that offer relief as well as opportunities. That's why our editors developed this package. We want to provide a breakdown of initiatives for job seekers, homeowners and buyers, taxpayers, and small business owners.

JOB SEEKERS

These days, with roughly 13 million unemployed Americans, most job seekers are looking for any type of employment--even a series of odd jobs and part-time gigs--to make ends meet. President Obama's Recovery Act promises to save or create more than 3 million jobs in areas such as healthcare, technology, renewable energy, education, and construction. But what can the unemployed do until those jobs become available? Gay Gilbert, administrator for the U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Workforce Investment, Employment and Training Administration, says the agency received approximately $4 billion from the stimulus bill as an infusion for such programs--double the amount it spends annually. Although the Labor Department funds national programs, it's up to state agencies to implement them. Gilbert explains that money flows directly from the federal government to the states. Local workforce investment boards decide how to allocate money and are responsible for implementing One-Stop Career Centers using Department of Labor program funding. "The stimulus has helped ramp up a new capacity to serve. Before the stimulus, our One-Stop Career Centers were really overflowing," she says. "There was desperation for services because states were so overwhelmed. But I think states are starting to solve these challenges."

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Funded through the Recovery Act, the programs that directly benefit

job seekers include:

* Adult Employment and Training Activities: This $500 million program provides training services to eligible individuals through local One-Stop Career Centers (www.careeronestop. org). With more than 3,000 local centers nationwide, job seekers can benefit from three levels of services:

1. Core services that offer outreach, job search and placement assistance, and labor market information.

2. Intensive services that provide comprehensive assessments, development counseling, and career planning.

3. Training services that give job seekers workplace opportunities within their communities as well as basic skills and individual occupational tutorials from qualified instructors.

* Dislocated Worker Employment and Training Activities: This $1.25 billion program assists workers who have been terminated or laid off from employment due to a permanent closure or substantial layoffs. Other eligible workers include individuals who have exhausted unemployment insurance; self-employed workers who can't find work because of an economic downturn or a natural disaster; and homemakers who no longer receive support from another family member. …

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What President Obama's Economic Agenda Means for You: Within Its First 100 Days, the New Administration Has Sought to Restore America with a Series of Financial Initiatives. Whether You're Job Hunting, Trying to Buy a Home, or Find Capital for Your Business, Our Editors Tell You How to Access the Resources You Need
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