Capitulation in Cairo? Obama Address Could Be His Munich Moment

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 13, 2009 | Go to article overview

Capitulation in Cairo? Obama Address Could Be His Munich Moment


Byline: Jeffrey Kuhner, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The real meaning of President Obama's recent address to the Muslim world in Cairo is that he is turning his back on the Jews at a time when they face another possible Holocaust.

Mr. Obama called for a new beginning in relations between the United States and Islamic civilization. He praised Islam's commitment to peace, "justic "and"religious tolerance." He listed the Muslim world's supposed contributions to history - algebra, the compass and the printing press, among others.

There is only one problem: It is all false. Mr. Obama's outreach to the Arab street is predicated on a massive multicultural fiction. He believes that, if only he praises Islam enough, somehow he can talk the Muslim world into embracing America - and the West. The Holy Koran tells us, 'Be conscious of God and speak always the truth,'" said Mr. Obama, quoting the Muslim holy book. Yet his speech was riddled with lies.

It was not Islam, but the Greeks, who invented algebra. The Chinese gave us the compass. And Johannes Gutenberg - a German - created the modern printing press. What's next: Islam invented the Internet?

The address, however, was more than a puerile and pathetic exercise in political correctness. It will be remembered as the pivotal moment in history when the United States ceased to be a superpower. Sapped of its self-confidence and sense of grandiose destiny, America chose the policy of appeasement over confrontation, lies over truth, illusion over reality. At the heart of Mr. Obama's speech as well as his foreign policy is the notion that we are not at war with Islam. But the real issue is the very opposite: Political Islam is at war with us - or to be more precise, radical fundamentalists are bent on destroying America, Israel and the West.

The liberals' mantra is that the majority of Muslims are nonviolent moderates. This is undeniably true. But it misses the point.

During the 1930s, appeasement was based upon the notion that a majority of Germans were decent people who simply wanted peace and national self-determination. Thus, British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain made the fateful decision to give away the Sudetenland, Czechoslovakia's ethnic German region, to Adolf Hitler's Nazi regime.

By betraying the Czechs at the Munich conference, Chamberlain believed he had secured peace for our time. Instead, he had emboldened Hitler to wage a war of conquest. The end result was a Europe in tatters, 50 million dead and the Holocaust. The fact that there were countless moderate, anti-Nazi Germans meant nothing. Their refusal to speak out against Hitler's Aryan racialism guaranteed its march to power - and destruction. History reveals that it is militant minorities - not reasonable majorities - that often drive events.

Across the Muslim world, Islamists are on the march. They may represent only 10 percent of the Muslim population, but that still amounts to nearly 150 million people. Mr. Obama rarely mentioned democracy and never said the word terrorism. …

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Capitulation in Cairo? Obama Address Could Be His Munich Moment
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