A Lighter Side to Soul Food: Healthy Concepts Inc. Finds Success in Development of Ethnic Cuisine

By Kimbe-Ellis, Sonya | Black Enterprise, February 1998 | Go to article overview

A Lighter Side to Soul Food: Healthy Concepts Inc. Finds Success in Development of Ethnic Cuisine


Kimbe-Ellis, Sonya, Black Enterprise


To some, nutrition means bean sprouts and beet juice. But eating healthy doesn't necessarily mean having to sacrifice a tasty meal. To give health buffs some flavorful choices, Wilbert Jones launched Healthy Concepts Inc., a Chicago-based food consulting business, in 1993.

Specializing in ethnic cuisine, Healthy Concepts helps food manufacturers and restaurants prepare nutritious menus that include African American, Caribbean, Creole, Mexican, Italian and Asian dishes. Revenues in 1996 reached $360,000.

The seven-employee firm provides a number of food services such as nutritional labeling, education and consulting, product-and-recipe development, analytical testing and shelf-life studies for food products. Clients include the Chicago Public School System, Professional Foodservice Inc., a food service referral company, and Romeo's Exotic Juice and Butterball Turkey Co.

Jones, 33, developed his culinary skills while studying French regional and nutritional cooking at the Ecole de Gastronomie Francaise Ritz-Escoffier culinary school in Paris.

In 1985, he worked as a food scientist with Kraft General Foods, and after eight years with the company, he decided to branch out on his own. "I wanted to start my own business, so I requested a release package to leave the company," says Jones.

Using $31,000 of his $35,000 package, Jones purchased some basic office equipment: a fax machine, two computers and a modem. He also solicited the help of consultants from the University of Chicago's Student Consulting Program to get the business off the ground.

By maintaining a strong relationship with his former employer, Jones was able to secure Kraft as a client in 1996. "We worked together on developing six to eight recipes for the African American market that would be appropriate for Kwanzaa," says Maria Alamo Cameron, a former consumer food manager for Kraft.

The recipes were used on coupons distributed to grocery stores in African American neighborhoods nationwide. …

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