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Tummy Mummies. Pregnant Women Put Child's Health at Risk by Trying to Get Figures like Celebrities

The Mirror (London, England), June 23, 2009 | Go to article overview

Tummy Mummies. Pregnant Women Put Child's Health at Risk by Trying to Get Figures like Celebrities


Byline: DEMELZA de BURCA

MUMS who go on crash diets after giving birth are putting their babies at risk, it was revealed yesterday.

A study also found these women are under too much pressure to lose weight quickly after delivery.

Health experts are concerned some are resorting to crash dieting or setting unrealistic goals - such as wanting their figure back by the time the baby is just 12 weeks' old.

But research has revealed taking three to six months to lose weight gained in pregnancy is normal.

Experts from the German Institute For Quality And Efficiency In Health Care added overdoing early weightloss attempts could have a negative impact on breastfeeding.

The researchers said: "Often the extra effort women have to make to look after a new baby and breastfeed after giving birth means the kilos just melt away.

"But for about half of all women the weight will not go away as quickly."

The study also found strenuous exercise soon after childbirth did not lead to extra weight loss.

But gradually losing the pounds is important to avoid diabetes and heart problems. Margot Brennan of the Irish Nutrition and Dietetic Institute also slammed the trend for dieting straight after birth. She added: "After giving birth the mother's nutrition is very low. We would never recommend any mum to diet, especially in the first eight weeks after the birth."

"It's the same for celebrity mothers too.

"They may have been dieting and exercising all their lives but they're putting their health in jeopardy by embarking in crash dieting and exercise straight after giving birth."

Many women say they face pressure from images of famous mums who appear to "snap" back into shape just weeks after giving birth.

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