Dead Sea Scrolls


Price per lecture: $28, online $26; ROM Members and students $25, online $23. Four-lecture packages are available for $84 ($75 Members) and 14-lecture packages for $252 ($225 Members). For details or to register, go to rom.on.ca/scrolls or call 416.586.5797.

All lectures will be held in the Signy and Cleophee Eaton Theatre or the Samuel Hall Currelly Gallery twice per night-at 6 pm and 8 pm, unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday, June 23 The Impact of the dead Sea Scrolls on the Bible

Dr. Eugene Ulrich, John A. O'Brien Professor of Hebrew Scriptures, university of Notre Dame, and chief editor of the Biblical Qumran Scrolls.

Thursday, July 2 The archaeology of Khirbet Qumran: recent excavation discoveries

Yuval Peleg, Israel Antiquities Authority district Archaeologist for the Jordan valley.

Thursday, July 16 The Stories of the Toronto dead Sea Scrolls

Dr. Marty Abegg, Ben Zion Wacholder Professor of dead Sea Scroll Studies, Religious Studies department, Trinity Western university, Langley, British Columbia, and co-director of the dead Sea Scrolls Institute.

Thursday, July 23 Jerusalem in the dead Sea Scrolls

Dr. Dan Bahat, former district archaeologist for Jerusalem, and currently associate professor, university of St. Michael's College, university of Toronto.

Wednesday, September 16 The Historical Problem of the Essenes

Dr. Steve Mason, professor, department of History, and Canada Research Chair in Greco-Roman Cultural Interaction, York university, Toronto.

Thursday, September 24 The archaeology of Qumran and the dead Sea Scrolls

Dr. Jodi Magness, Kenan distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism, department of Religious Studies, university of north Carolina, Chapel Hill.

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