Snap Up a Sought-After Sampler

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), June 27, 2009 | Go to article overview

Snap Up a Sought-After Sampler


Byline: Bargain Hunter

EVEN after all these years, I can still remember the futile efforts of one of my primary school teachers to teach me how to sew.

My incompetence was such that I ended up feeling really sorry for her.

Perhaps because of my own lack of skill in this department, I've always appreciated it in others.

I'm clearly not alone in this appreciation, as collecting antique samplers, with their variety of stitches and motifs, is an extremely popular field.

The word sampler comes from the same root as the word example, meaning an example or model to be followed.

Some of the earliest samplers, from the 16th century, were made from long thin strips of linen worked in a variety of stitches.

These band samplers, as they're called, served as reference works for stitchers and were kept rolled up in a drawer until needed.

The earliest dated sampler is housed in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Made by a Jane Bostocke in 1598 this isn't a band sampler, but what is known as a spot motif sampler, covered with a variety of different motifs worked in different stitches and colours.

These spot motif samplers were particularly popular in the 17th century and could be incorporated into bed hangings and costumes.

It was in the second half of the 18th century that sewing samplers came to be seen as part of a young girl's education. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Snap Up a Sought-After Sampler
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.