Resisting the 'Siren Song of Socialism'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 30, 2009 | Go to article overview

Resisting the 'Siren Song of Socialism'


Byline: Herbert London, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

It would appear that the Republican Party is moribund. President Obama's initiatives have set Republicans back on their heels. The Republican minority in Congress can say no, but the word doesn't resonate. Obamacrats can bulldoze the legislative process, converting America into a command economy with government expanding its authority each passing day.

But all is not lost.

There is a senatorial voice that sings a different Washington tune. He is Sen. Jim DeMint, South Carolina Republican, and he not only continually exposes the drift to socialism in the United States, he offers a plan of action in his latest book, Saving Freedom, released by Fidelis Books.

Mr. DeMint understands that what is at stake in the present government grab for power is nothing less than the loss of freedom. As former President Gerald R. Ford noted, A government that is large enough to give you everything you want is big enough to take everything you have. Thomas Jefferson was prescient about the present administration when he noted in the beginning of the 19th century that a democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not.

Freedom is imperiled when the government serves as the engineer to adjudicate what it believes to be social inequities. The engineers often act out of magnanimous motives, as Mr. DeMint indicates, but the results are often destructive. Freedom suffers when good intentions are translated into misguided policies. In fact, most in Congress never heard of the law of unintended consequences.

Mr. DeMint writes eloquently of the siren song of socialism. Alas, the song is irresistible because the melody is sweet, the lyrics comforting, but, as was the case with Odysseus, those who succumb to the siren song are doomed.

There are foundational positions adopted by the Founding Fathers that have served this nation well for more than 200 years. They include ideas that once needed no recitation; they were built into the warp and woof of the nation. But we have forgotten or overlooked them in our time. They include: limited government, checks and balances, a nexus to our Judeo-Christian traditions, a rule of law based on constitutional provisions, a respect for private property, a reliance on individual rights, equality before the law.

What we seemingly have at the moment is a group of unbounded Robin Hoods who assume they are acting against the Sheriff of Nottingham.

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