Comparing Japanese International College Students' and U.S. College Students' Mental-Health-Related Stigmatizing Attitudes

By Masuda, Akihiko; Hayes, Steven C. et al. | Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, July 2009 | Go to article overview

Comparing Japanese International College Students' and U.S. College Students' Mental-Health-Related Stigmatizing Attitudes


Masuda, Akihiko, Hayes, Steven C., Twohig, Michael P., Lillis, Jason, Fletcher, Lindsay B., Gloster, Andrew T., Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development


This study examined differences between Japanese international college students and U.S. college students on stigma toward people with psychological disorders, stigma tolerance in help seeking, and self-concealment. Japanese international students had greater stigma toward individuals with psychological disorders than did their U.S. counterparts. No interrelationships between these variables, however, were found in the Japanese international student group.

Este estudio examino las diferencias entre estudiantes universitarios internacionales japoneses y estudiantes universitarios estadounidenses en Io concerniente al estigma hacia las personas con trastornos psicologicos, la tolerancia del estigma al buscar ayuda y la auto-ocultacion. Los estudiantes internacionales japoneses mostraron un mayor estigma hacia los individuos con trastornos psicologicos que sus homologos estadounidenses. Sin embargo, no se encontro ninguna interrelacion entre estas variables en el grupo de estudiantes internacionales japoneses.

**********

According to the Institute of International Education (2006), there were more than 564,000 international college students studying in the United States in 2005-2006, and Japanese international students (N = more than 38,000) constituted the fourth largest international student group. (Note. In this article, all references to international students refer to international students studying at a college or university in the United States.) Within the multicultural context of the United States, rates of use of psychological services among international students on U.S. college and university campuses are lower than those among native students and, thus, are of great concern (e.g., Frey & Roysircar, 2006; Yi, Giseala, & Kishimoto, 2003; Zhang & Dixon, 2001). Japanese international students come from a culture in which the use of and unfavorable attitudes toward professional psychological care are documented (e.g., Fukuhara, 1986; Yeh, Inose, Kobori, & Chang, 2001).

variables related to treatment seeking

In the United States, researchers and psychological professionals have identified psychosocial variables related to the underuse of psychological services. One such variable is stigmatizing attitudes toward psychological disorders. The U.S. Surgeon General's report on mental health stated that stigma serves as an obstacle that hinders people from using mental health care services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1999). Stigma, in this context, maybe defined as a multidimensional negative attitude toward a group of people who are construed to be lacking appropriate skills or abilities. As a result, individuals who are stigmatized are viewed as incompetent, unpredictable, or threatening (Kurzban & Leary, 2001). Studies have shown that the general public tends to have stigmatizing attitudes toward psychological disorders and individuals who have them (Crisp, Gelder, Rix, Meltzer, & Rowlands, 2000). These stigmatizing attitudes are even greater if these individuals are known to have sought professional psychological services (Ben-Porath, 2002).

Another set of variables known to be related to treatment seeking are attitudes toward seeking professional psychological services. Evidence suggests that individuals who have less favorable help-seeking attitudes tend to have greater stigmatizing attitudes toward people with psychological disorders (e.g., Leong & Zachar, 1999).

Stigma toward individuals with psychological disorders may extend to negative self-evaluation regarding personal experiences with psychological distress. A variable that may capture this type of negative self-evaluation (e.g., self-stigma) is self-concealment. Self-concealment is the tendency to hide distressing and potentially embarrassing personal information (Larson & Chastain, 1990). Studies have shown that self-concealment is positively associated with psychological distress (Cramer, 1999) and with negative attitudes toward seeking professional psychological services (Cepeda-Benito & Short, 1998; Kelly & Achter, 1995). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Comparing Japanese International College Students' and U.S. College Students' Mental-Health-Related Stigmatizing Attitudes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.