Famous Neighborhood Gets Fresh Look

Nation's Cities Weekly, February 16, 1998 | Go to article overview

Famous Neighborhood Gets Fresh Look


Dayton, Ohio has addressed the challenge to blend the old and new into a revitalized inner city neighborhood, thanks to the assistance of numerous partnerships--both public and private--generating a $20 million investment.

The Wright-Dunbar Village Project is the most aggressive urban renewal project taken on by the City of Dayton in the last 20 years. The west Dayton neighborhood has experienced what has become typical of some inner city neighborhoods with businesses closed, buildings left abandoned, residents moving out, and an overall deterioration of the area. But a community-wide initiative is changing all that.

History of area

The Wright-Dunbar Village is named in honor of three of Dayton's most famous residents. The pioneers of flight, the Wright Brothers, Orville and Wilbur, grew up and operated businesses in the neighborhood. African-American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar also made his home in the area.

The housing renovations now taking place in the neighborhood will complement other activities in what was recently designated the Dayton Aviation Heritage National Park. The national park was named in honor of the Wright Brothers' contribution to Dayton's history. The Dayton community will be celebrating 100 years of flight in 2003, and revitalizing the housing stock in Wright-Dunbar Village has been a high priority to enhance the appearance of the neighborhood in time for the centennial festivities.

Plans for the Wright-Dunbar Village project called for renovating approximately 100 vacant or abandoned houses and constructing another 40 new in fill houses. The project has been a collaborative effort between the City of Dayton; the project management team, Projdel; numerous financial institutions; the Home Builders Association of Dayton and the Miami Valley; and residents of the neighborhood.

While the details and planning for the project took many years to evolve, actual construction of Phase I on the village began in May, 1995, with the city's initial investment of $4.8 million.

Private Dollars Invested

The city's initial investment has leveraged another $3 million in private funds in Wright-Dunbar Village. Much of the early private investment was made when 12 vacant homes were sold for renovation to individuals and three to the Neighborhood Development Corporation for $1 via a lottery process. Interested buyers in the lottery process were required to provide proof of financial ability to renovate, agree to a renovation deadline, and be willing to adhere to the residency requirements to boost home ownership. Eight empty lots were also sold to developers to build new in-fill houses. The official open house ceremonies, held in October, 1997, generated so much interest that another six additional houses were awarded in the lottery and presales were closed for another nine newly built homes.

Infrastracture Improvements

Along with the new and rehabilitated homes, the complete Wright-Dunbar Village project included a variety of infrastructure and utility improvements, such as new water and gas service, the repair of streets, sidewalks and curbs, the installation of ornamental period street lighting, and the planting of new trees in the area.

The Fourth Street Gateway Project serves as the official bonds to finance the construction, maintenance, or repair of electric generating or transmission equipment and to require any municipally owned utility that permitted other utilities access to its transmission lines or provided electricity outside its boundaries to call its current outstanding municipal bonds.

Federal action on electric utility deregulation has already preempted some municipal finance authority. Action in 1998 by Congress could lead to the same sort of rate increases city residents have experienced since Congress deregulated cable rates. Congressional action could have serious consequences for municipal rights-of-way, franchise, and tax authority. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Famous Neighborhood Gets Fresh Look
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.