Bookshelf

By Graham, William C. | National Catholic Reporter, March 6, 1998 | Go to article overview

Bookshelf


Graham, William C., National Catholic Reporter


Let's begin with a trio, three books that are sure to be welcome by those who seek to improve their prayer life:

The Doubleday Prayer Collection: Over 1300 Prayers for All Occasions, selected and arranged by Mary Batchelor (Doubleday, 181 pages, $11.95 paperback), is a lovely collection for prayer and for perusal.

Prayer-Moments for Every Day of the Year, by Sister of Notre Dame Mary Kathleen Glavich (Twenty-Third, 70 pages, $7.95 paperback), is another fine collection of snippets from the saints and the liturgy that is sure to provoke prayer and wonder.

Sacred Moments: Daily Meditations on the Virtues, by Linda Kavelin Popov (Plume Books, a member of Penguin Putnam, 365 unnumbered pages, $12.95 paperback), invites contemplation of our links with the divine through the highest qualities of humanity. It includes stories by the author and selected quotes for each week of the year.

Theological Education in the Catholic Tradition: Contemporary Challenges, edited by Patrick W. Carey and Jesuit Fr. Earl C. Muller (Crossroad, 423 pages, $29.95 paperback), raises questions about the contemporary theological enterprise and suggests ways to improve theological education at the college, seminary and graduate levels. It includes contributions by many well-respected scholars and ought to be a helpful resource in an ongoing, significant conversation.

Sacramental Ministry to a Diverse Generation, by Margaret L. Black (Sheed & Ward, 118 pages, $12.95 paperback), addresses baby boomers, their children and grandchildren, from both left and right, who remain faithful to the sacraments. Black, a boomer herself as well as a family life minister and former director of religious education, looks to statistics, sociology and psychology as well as theology to renew her own sacramental imagination and reaction to the baby boomer challenge.

A good resource to pass on to those who grieve is Always Precious in Our Memory: Reflections after Miscarriage, Stillbirth or Neonatal Death, by Kristen Johnson Ingram (ACTA Publications, 94 pages, $8.95 paperback). These meditations will offer comfort and assurance to those who suffer loss.

The Renewal that Awaits Us, edited by Josephite Sr. Eleanor Bernstein and Martin F. Connell (Liturgy Training Publications, 176 pages, $12 paper-back), is a collection of papers delivered at the 1995 conference of the Notre Dame Center for Pastoral Liturgy. Participants asked and answered significant questions, including: Have the liturgical reforms of the Second Vatican Council already taken place? Are there still reforms to be realized? What aspects of reform have been seeds of new life in parishes and communities? What aspects have been less fruitful? Contributors include Benedictine Fr. Anscar Chupungco, Nathan D. Mitchell, Benedictine Sr. Mary Collins and Mercy Sr. Julia Upton.

The Hungry Spirit: Beyond Capitalism: A Quest for Purpose in the Modern World, by Charles Handy (Broadway Books, a Division of Bantam Doubleday Dell, 267 pages, $25 hardbound), really does move beyond capitalism. Handy concludes that humanity should be trusted more than the system, certain that "we are most fully ourselves when we lose ourselves in our concern for others or in a cause that is greater than we are."

In A Cobbler's Universe: Religion, Poetry, and Performance in the Life of a South Italian Immigrant (Continuum, 204 pages, $39.50 paperback), noted scholar Catherine L. Albanese edits and translates, introduces and annotates the papers and poems left by her grandfather, an immigrant to Philadelphia who died in 1958. This look at his life is a look at the life of immigrants as they claimed the new land as their own. Albanese's study offers a look at culture and experience as a new, interesting and important way of studying the past as it has shaped the present.

Irenaeus of Lyons, in the second century, was one of those responsible for the construction of Christian identity. …

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