System's Politicalsupport Fading Lawmakers Calling for Tighter Rules

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 16, 2009 | Go to article overview

System's Politicalsupport Fading Lawmakers Calling for Tighter Rules


Byline: Joseph Ryan and John Patterson jryan@dailyherald.com jopatterson@dailyherald.com

Red-light cameras were shepherded into the suburbs several years ago with wide political support.

That backing is evaporating.

Numerous suburban lawmakers are now criticizing the red-light camera system in the wake of a Daily Herald investigative series that sparked questions about how and why cameras are being used. Lawmakers now are considering tighter regulations and better oversight, and some are even arguing for the outright elimination of the aggressive enforcement.

"I hate them. I absolutely hate them," said state Rep. Jim Durkin, a Western Springs Republican who voted for the original red-light camera legislation back in 2006. "It is strictly a moneymaking mechanism. I dont believe it goes to public safety."

The Daily Herald series revealed how most $100 red-light camera tickets go to drivers making a right turn on red without coming to a complete stop, a practice experts say is often not a significant safety concern even though it is against the law. The series also revealed how some cameras are going up at intersections where few crashes occur because of running red lights, raising questions about whether theyre being used for

safety or revenue.

Meanwhile, the verdict is not yet in on whether the cameras are making roads safer, particularly because of where the cameras are being used and the type of common driving behavior they are profiting from.

State Rep. Paul Froehlich, a Schaumburg Democrat who voted for red-light cameras, says he will support tighter regulation to eliminate public concern that the cameras are misused to make money.

"This tends to reinforce the public perception that these guys are trying to haul in as much cash as they can," Froehlich said. "That undercuts public support, and if you lose that, then these things could be gone entirely."

Most lawmakers asked about the Daily Heralds findings said they still support the concept of using cameras to make intersections safer, but they want better oversight to ensure the enforcement of them makes intersections safer.

"Im generally supportive of the red-light cameras," said state Rep. Elaine Nekritz, a Northbrook Democrat who supported the original legislation. "But I think we do need to rethink what we are doing with these things."

For now it remains unclear what lawmakers will propose as a solution, whether it be tougher standards written into law or giving a state agency authority over the installation of all cameras. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

System's Politicalsupport Fading Lawmakers Calling for Tighter Rules
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.