Letters in the Editor's Mailbag

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), June 12, 2009 | Go to article overview

Letters in the Editor's Mailbag


Byline: The Register-Guard

A raffle fantasy for Civic Stadium

Once upon a time in a town called Eugene, a small grocery store, with help from a local bike shop, raffled off a men's bicycle as a means to raise funds to renovate the ancient, mighty Civic Stadium.

Word spread of the raffle. Thousands of tickets were purchased. The winner, a die-hard Civic fan, donated the bike to the local SaveCivicStadium organization, which once again put it up for raffle. This time, the local media picked up the story. Tens of thousands of tickets were sold. And once again, the winner donated the bike for another raffle.

On and on, raffle after raffle, the same bike all summer long. Soon, all America caught wind of this town's great odd effort to save its Civic Stadium. In time, the whole world was watching.

Then, as the final batter of the 2009 World Series stepped to the plate, it was announced that the bike sold in auction for $4 million to a future Hall of Famer who once, as a minor league ballplayer, signed an autograph for a little girl at Eugene's Civic Stadium.

And we all lived happily ever after.

Scott Landfield

Eugene

Better health care common abroad

With misleading ads, the Republicans are once again trying to spook the American public into rejecting what is in the public's interest.

I have friends in Canada, England, Holland and Germany. All these countries have universal health care systems, and no one in those countries is demanding an American-style health care system. What do people in those countries know that Republicans don't want to talk about?

Miriam Reinhart

Junction City

No combustion is `clean'

I appreciate our Eugene mayor's effort to find out more about effects of the Seneca Sawmill Co.'s biomass cogeneration plant on the environment (Commentary, June 7). However, the fact that the company plans to remove oxides of nitrogen does not make this type of energy generation "clean."

Just as with "clean" coal and "clean" natural gas, wood waste produces energy by burning (oxidizing) carbon. No matter where the carbon comes from - wood, natural gas, coal or oil - each molecule of carbon when burned produces a molecule of carbon dioxide, the compound most responsible for global warming.

Of the common energy sources now available, only wind, wave, water, solar and nuclear produce no carbon dioxide (and nuclear has its own formidable waste problem). I would much rather see the wood waste go into building materials (particleboard, for example), with electrical energy being supplied by the non-combustion alternatives.

We have to start this somewhere, why not Oregon? California, by the way, is ahead of us.

Joe Palen

Eugene

Post should outsource Will

Since George Will is so enamored of foreign trade - especially with China - perhaps The Washington Post could improve its bottom line by outsourcing Will's column, which seems to be getting more un-American all the time anyway.

I'm sure The Washington Post could find a reasonably articulate individual or three - fluent in English - in Beijing, or perhaps in Delhi, who could crank out similar drivel for a lot less money.

Robert Walters

Waldport

Mentally ill not dangerous

I chose to pick up a paper recently because of the front page article on the mentally ill facility for nonviolent offenders (Register-Guard, June 7). I was appalled by the words used to describe those living with a mental disability: Having a mental illness does not make a person more likely to go "nuts," as one person put it. …

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