The Maputo Covenant All Africa Conference of Churches

The Ecumenical Review, July 2009 | Go to article overview

The Maputo Covenant All Africa Conference of Churches


Preamble

The All Africa Conference of Churches is a fellowship of 172 member Churches and Christian Councils in 4 3 African countries working, not as an entity separated from the world, but as God's instrument for God's reconciling and renewing mission in and for the world and all aspects of life.

After much biblical reflection, prayerful searching, theological conversation, and relying on the promised guidance of the Holy Spirit, the AACC members and their partners meeting in Maputo, Mozambique from 7-12 December, 2008 hereby resolved to STEP FORTH IN FAITH, covenanting themselves as follows:

Covenant One: moral regeneration in the continent

We recognize that Africa is in deep moral decay which manifests itself in the abuse of human rights, abuse of family life, violence, materialism, corruption, war, to mention but a few. Our values, institutions and ways of living have been influenced by a warped world view of individualism rather than the African primal world view of community.

We observe the media has played a positive role in the behavioural change of our people, we are also aware that it has been a key driver of immorality both at personal and public levels. We realize that prosperity theology and other theologies that breed greed have been legitimized and moral decay sustained in Africa. These dangerous trends challenge the church to rise therefore as a moral regenerator and mobilize resources to empower individuals and the broader society for transformation.

Response

We pledge, in view of God's mercy, to offer our bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God as our spiritual act of worship.

We commit ourselves to instituting hope and redefining morality as experienced in the resurrection of Lazarus (John 11:43).

We commit ourselves to engage the mass media for responsible journalism that respects the context of the African people while still playing its role in society.

Africa, step forth in faith!

Covenant Two: youth and children in the renewal of Africa

We recognize that the wisdom of the old and the strength of the youth and children are required for God's mission in Africa. But we also realize that current mission environments in many of our churches do not bode well in allowing the youth and children to participate in God's mission to redeem a broken and sinful world. Apparently, African youth and children are battling with the challenges brought by a highly technological world, human trafficking, drugs, HIV/AIDS, violence in wars, etc. In addressing the problems of the continent, we must decide to live with a sense of collective responsibility, humbly dismantling the ecclesiastical structures that have long excluded the youth from the mission in the church. Together with the youth, the churches can take responsibility for the present and future renewal of the ecclesia and the entire continent.

Response

We acknowledge God's endowments on the youth and children regardless of their age or status in fife.

We affirm the youth and children as veritable partners in God's mission in the renewal of Africa.

We commit ourselves to the dismantling of the ecclesiastical structures that have long excluded the young from mission in the church and society.

We commit ourselves to youth and children empowerment for effective leadership through capacity building, African education systems and curriculum, youth innovation and entrepreneurship.

Africa, step forth in faith!

Covenant Three: urban mission

With urbanization in Africa comes the drumbeat of the city; a city with a new community: migrants, refugees, the jobless and the homeless. It is a community that has its own characteristics, concerns, and points of convergence which challenge the missional identity of the church as well as demand a new missional paradigm. As an "open market" place, African urban contexts have become ecological and ideological battlegrounds where a new sense of Christian community with ecumenical connections is a missional imperative. …

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