A Portrait of the Artist as a Deviant: Turn the Switch off on "No Snitching"

By Bayne, Clarence | Kola, Summer 2009 | Go to article overview

A Portrait of the Artist as a Deviant: Turn the Switch off on "No Snitching"


Bayne, Clarence, Kola


Clarence Bayne A Portrait of the Artist as a Deviant: Turn the switch off on "no Snitching".

Is it possible that the KKK is right? They claim that their job on Blacks are done, because a set of black hip hop artists from the "wormwood" of society are doing a better job at demeaning and abusing Black people, especially Black women. They are the neoclassical poets of the ghetto. The White classical poets put their women on a pedestal, the neoclassical made them approachable and attainable; but these worms that infest the earth and furniture of ghetto life drag women down, Black women, and transform them into bitches, whores, and used-up chattel. But maybe this disease has spread deeper than that. And the KKK has missed the point. Novel Thomas in his article, "Of Dogs and Humans, Who Do You Love More?" (Community Contact 29, August 2007) strongly suggests that the human race has become participants in a pit bull fight to the death for no other reason than that they have become loveless creatures that have forfeited the benefit of redemption that comes with the capacity to love. David Banner is a screwed up hip hop "artist", a graduate from uncle Screw tapes' correspondence school (Cf. C. S. Lewis, Screw Tape Letters: From a Senior Devil to a Junior Devil). He has lost love and its conscience. He is somewhere in the valley of the dead looking for it, before he passes into another life. Will it be a hell where eternally he chokes on the bile of hate which he can never completely vomit? Or will he discover self respect, hope and purpose beyond the damnation of self-destructive hat?. Uncle Screw tape has got David Banner in his grip, locked in the bottomless pit of denial, beyond the unconscious. Are David Banner and his wormwood pals by nature depraved, as the KKK might claim? No. But they have become so. Is their history one of victims of abuse, disadvantaged, enslaved, valued only for their physical properties, equated to chattel, abandoned and left fatherless? Yes. They are clearly not blessed with the patience of Job; and Uncle Screw Tape has got them trapped in the brutal brilliance of his deception. For they believe that they are artists and that that gives them the right to say whatever they want, an illusion of democracy without responsibility. I will not question their claims to being artists for art has never stopped anyone from being vile, nor nations from looting, pillaging raping and destroying other nations. Art has not stopped the White man from turning the White woman into sex objects and bribing her to play the role. The issue then is not whether they are artists but whether their artistic expressions destroy their souls and the souls of others.

We are told by Black hip hop corporate apologists that we must understand the environments from which these artists come and why they use language the way they do; that their violent butchering of Black women is creative manifestations of their life experiences. Yes, we know that life could be a living hell. But why should we excuse and tolerate their persistent teachings of self hate, disrespect for life, rape and abuse of women, the protection of murderers, pimping and prostitution by brute force and psychological enslavement, the poisoning of the bodies of our children with drugs? Why should we allow them to imprison us in a hell created for their profit under the distraction of the noise of their angry rage (their music) and their skilful exploitation of our mistrust of mainstream society and racial profiling?

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