The Common Good


Responsible citizenship demands that every one within any governance unit should feel responsible for the welfare, progress, continued strength and sustainability of the city or province, and of the organization or institution. In this regard, all of us are called upon to be generous, including in our sacrifices for the common good.Those in authority, however, have a special duty of sacrificing for the common good of the governance unit of which they are the “governors”. For the discharge of such a duty, they have been placed in positions of responsibility along with the powers and privileges that those positions confer. Lest they allow themselves to be bewitched, smitten, and snowed under by the powers and privileges they enjoy, they should constantly reflect on the operative significance of fairness in their instance. In fact, as fairness would have it, those powers and privileges always come with the duties of governance; and those duties orient them towards a total commitment, often at enormous self-sacrifice and heroic selflessness, to the common good of the governance unit that they govern.The duty of good governance on the shoulders of the “governors” is the natural and necessary complement of the duty of responsible citizenship on the shoulders of all, particularly of the “governed”. These two duties – of good governance and responsible citizenship – go together; one cannot go far without the other. Unless both go together, the common good of the governance unit could be compromised unhappily and often very negatively. …

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