Internet and Internet Use: Teacher Trainees' Perspective

By Akinoglu, Orhan | Journal of Instructional Psychology, June 2009 | Go to article overview

Internet and Internet Use: Teacher Trainees' Perspective


Akinoglu, Orhan, Journal of Instructional Psychology


The aim of this study is to present the development and issues of internet and internet use. The study has a descriptive survey design and 185 randomly selected teacher trainees at Marmara University, Ataturk Education Faculty in the 2001-2002 academic year constitute the sample. Data were collected via a questionnaire prepared by the researcher and analysed using percentages. Results were grouped under the following findings. According to the teacher trainees the most beneficial features of the internet were easy access to information, easy communication, feeling free and being able to access any part of the world, making the best of their free time and educational opportunities. The most harmful features of the internet were, respectively, loss of time, pornographic content, encouraging bad habits, high telephone bills and being addictive. If they had the chance to create a website on the internet, teacher trainees stated that they would first like to design a website for education, second for personal relations, third for information and entertainment, fourth about their hobbies and fifth about health. When their purposes for using the internet is listed, the first was sending emails, second surfing the web, third looking for information, fourth reading the news and fifth looking for schools and training. 29,5% of the teacher trainees believed that information on the websites is not reliable. 25,3 % thought that the roles of school and teachers have diminished in the current century. 26,1% supported the idea that internet technologies offer more original and varied learning opportunities than teachers, 23,9% that they offer individual learning opportunities, 23,9% that they provide access to up-to-date information, 15,2% that they offer multi-dimensional interaction opportunities and 10,9% that they facilitate free thinking.

Keywords: Education Technologies, Youth, Teacher Education, Internet Use

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With the rapid development of information technologies, 21st century, defined as the Information Age, has witnessed network of communication that encompasses the whole world. This rapid improvement of information technologies has led societies to a busier life, educational programs have been restructured, investment in education has increased and education policies have been established accordingly. Information technologies have been an impulsive force that have changed the structure of the society, culture, tradition, economy and education; established habits and relations have entered a process of renovation through a technology centered transformation (Bakardjieva & Smith, 2001; Bruce, 1999). Internet, which is widely used throughout the world since the 90s, is now the main source of information for written, oral and visual communication among people, for scientific research, productivity, cultural changes, global business and global education (Gross, 2004; James & Prout, 1997; Levy, 2001; Livingstone, 2003). Through information and communication services, internet has brought in multi-dimensionality to many sectors such as health, defence, industry, the public sector and primarily to education. Today, in all parts of the world, staying away from electronic communication and an inability to integrate it into education and thus an inability to benefit from this richness of information and communication is synonymous to being outdated. Only people who are yet to use the internet could be unaware of how this environment can transform the lives of people scientifically and socio-psychologically. Internet constitutes the foundation of new establishments around the world with its features of being a rich data bank, having a broad expansion area, having a rapid update speed, allowing interaction and facilitating easy information transfer. (Surratt, 2001; Turkle, 1995; Weber & Dixon, 2007).

Internet has offered education systems a contemporary understanding and has moved education to a new era in the context of technology. …

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