International Partnerships: Books and Librarians

American Libraries, February 1998 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

International Partnerships: Books and Librarians


Last year for the first time, ALA engaged in two international partnerships to organize delegations to book fairs.

In August a small group participated in the Zimbabwe International Book Fair, which is held annually in Harare (AL, Oct. 1997, p. 30). In December over 130 ALA members went to Mexico for the 11th Guadalajara Book Fair (AL, Jan., p. 44-46).

Librarians representing all types of libraries participated in these two book fairs. They ordered books, told stories at writers' workshops, presented papers at seminars, staffed the ALA exhibit booth, enjoyed cultural events, learned about publishing and libraries in Africa and Latin America, were interviewed by local media, visited libraries, and talked with colleagues from other countries.

Both these book fairs were open to children and the general public to promote reading and education. What a great idea!

Being the learner

Often when we think about international partnerships, we assume that we are doing the sharing and teaching. The Guadalajara and Zimbabwe book fairs are excellent examples of how we did most of the learning from these partnerships.

"Libraries" was the theme for the 1997 Zimbabwe fair. The result was a plethora of fascinating and varied events covering a broad spectrum of librarians' interests. Some 25 African countries were represented by the exhibitors, making it the largest single gathering of African publishers in the world. Programs on access to information, sharing resources among nongovernmental organization libraries, the role of library associations in building professional networks, and transforming Africa through writing provided opportunities for substantive dialogue with colleagues. "Children" will be the theme for the 1998 Zimbabwe fair.

The spotlight was on Argentina this year at the Guadalajara fair. A large exhibit focused on Argentinean books and cultural programs including movies, photography, dance (the tango and ballet), poets, novels, theater, music, and other literary genres.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

International Partnerships: Books and Librarians
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?