NAA Launches Part Two of National Readership Campaign

By Nicholson, Joe | Editor & Publisher, April 18, 1998 | Go to article overview

NAA Launches Part Two of National Readership Campaign


Nicholson, Joe, Editor & Publisher


Her smile invites you. Coyly glancing from behind a newspaper she's reading, supermodel Christy Turlington says she wants you and your children to read a paper, too.

"I've always felt that intellect is the most attractive thing about a person,' she says in text in an ad set to begin running in newspapers this month as part of the newspaper industry's literacy-by-reading-newspapers offensive. "That's why I'm grateful to my parents for helping my sisters and me develop our minds by reading to us and encouraging us to read. I urge you to read to your children and encourage them to read everything they can get their hands on"

The gorgeous model has enlisted in the second part of a literacy and marketing drive by the Newspaper Association of America, which is spending $14 million for the first two years of a planned three-year campaign that began last fall.

"Promoting literacy and readership is a message that has resonated deeply with the American public; declared NAA president and CEO John Sturm. "It is a message that is good for newspapers, good for the country, and most important of all, good for parents and their children"

Turlington's come-hither smile is expected to rotate in newspapers around the country. Other ads feature celebrities and ex-presidents: basketball superstar Grant Hill, Denver Broncos quarterback John Elway, rap musician LL Cool J and former first lady Barbara Bush. The first flight of the campaign included ads with ex-Presidents George Bush and Jimmy Carter; Gen. H. …

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NAA Launches Part Two of National Readership Campaign
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