R100 000 for Future Counselling

Cape Times (South Africa), August 7, 2009 | Go to article overview

R100 000 for Future Counselling


BYLINE: KAREN BREYTENBACH

A WOMAN who sued her alleged rapist and long-time abuser - who impregnated her when she was 14, almost 45 years ago - has reached an out-of-court settlement with him.

In terms of the arrangement, Southern Cape businessman Peter Jackson denied ever raping or sexually assaulting Gaynor Duggan when they were growing up in Port Elizabeth in the 1960s, and Duggan withdrew her allegations.

Jackson regretted the "role he played in her trauma" and the consequences she would continue to suffer.

Clinical neuropsychologist Cora de Villiers and counselling psychologist Rosa Bredekamp found the consequences Duggan manifested were consistent with child sexual abuse.

Jackson agreed to pay R100 000, as a contribution to future counselling for Duggan, into her attorneys' trust account. Each party would pay their own costs.

Jackson's attorney, Conrad de Beer, and senior counsel, Annemarie de Vos, said the offer was a gesture of goodwill and an acknowledgement by Jackson of what Duggan must have gone through having their baby.

Duggan said she felt her main purpose had been achieved, "in that the original trauma and the damage to me, as the victim, has been acknowledged".

"The process of getting to this point has been extraordinarily difficult - and it was to prevent further trauma and avoid the necessity of dragging other parties into the case that I agreed to settle," she said. …

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